Index by Title : R

  • Racial Disproportionality in Child Welfare
    Author(s): Harris, Marian S.
    Abstract:

    The number of children of color entering the child welfare system in the United States is disproportionately high. This is especially true among African-American children, who, though they comprise 15% of children in the U.S., account for 37% of the total children placed in foster care. The numbers are also high for Native American and Latino children. Not only are children of color removed from parental custody and placed in care more often than their white counterparts, but they also remain in care longer, receive fewer services, and have less contact with the caseworkers assigned to them.

    This book identifies the practice and policy changes required to successfully address the unequal treatment of children of color in the child welfare system and their implications for social work education, caseworker training, and institutional change. The work critiques many of the existing social welfare acts and policies in terms of their treatment of children of color, and it provides best practices for each decision point in the child welfare process and for cultural competency measures and training. The text offers extensive measurement instruments that agencies can use to assess and correct institutional racism. To improve social work education, the book includes several model syllabi for the social work curriculum, and to deepen the discipline’s engagement with this issue, the text concludes with a discussion of future directions for research and policy.

  • Reforming the International Financial System for Development
    Author(s): Kwame Sundaram, Jomo
    Keyword(s): IPD
    Abstract:

    The 1944 Bretton Woods conference created new institutions for international economic governance. Though flawed, the system led to a golden age in postwar reconstruction, sustained economic growth, job creation, and postcolonial development. Yet financial liberalization since the 1970s has involved deregulation and globalization, which have exacerbated instability, rather than sustained growth. In addition, the failure of Bretton Woods to provide a reserve currency enabled the dollar to fill the void, which has contributed to periodic, massive U.S. trade deficits.

    Our latest global financial crisis, in which all these weaknesses played a part, underscores how urgently we must reform the international financial system. Prepared for the G24 research program, a consortium of developing countries focused on financial issues, this volume argues that such reforms must be developmental. Chapters review historical trends in global liquidity, financial flows to emerging markets, and the food crisis, identifying the systemic flaws that contributed to the recent downturn. They challenge the effectiveness of recent policy and suggest criteria for regulatory reform, keeping in mind the different circumstances, capacities, and capabilities of various economies. Essays follow ongoing revisions in international banking standards, the improved management of international capital flows, the critical role of the World Trade Organization in liberalizing and globalizing financial services, and the need for international tax cooperation. They also propose new global banking and reserve currency arrangements.

  • Research Methods in Child Welfare
    Author(s): Baker, Amy J. L.; Charvat, Benjamin J.
    Abstract:

    Social service agencies are facing the same expectations in quality management and outcomes as private companies, compelling staff members and researchers to provide and interpret valid and useful research to stakeholders at all levels in the field. Child welfare agencies are particularly scrutinized. In this textbook, two highly experienced researchers offer the best techniques for conducting sound research in the field. Covering not only the methodological challenges but also the real-life constraints of research in child welfare settings, Amy J. L. Baker and Benjamin J. Charvat present a volume that can be used both for general research methods and as a practical guide for conducting research in the field of child welfare.

    Baker and Charvat devote an entire chapter to ethical issues involved in researching children and their families and the limits of confidentiality within this population. They weave a discussion of ethics throughout the book, and each chapter begins with a scenario that presents a question or problem to work through, enabling readers to fully grasp the methods in the context of a specific setting or area of concern. Special sections concentrate on the value of continuous quality-improvement activities, which enable the collection and analysis of data outside of the strictures of publishable research, and the implementation of program evaluations, which can be helpful in obtaining further research and programmatic funding.

  • Research Techniques for Clinical Social Workers, Second Edition
    Author(s): Vonk, M. Elizabeth, Tony Tripodi, and Irwin Epstein
    Keyword(s): SW10; SW11; CSWO
    Abstract:

    This volume has long been an invaluable resource for students and practitioners of social work. It thoroughly and clearly presents research concepts and skills, uniquely organizing them according to assessment and treatment formulation, treatment implementation and monitoring, and evaluation. Also, numerous practice cases and detailed exercises offer a complete grasp of crucial concepts and techniques.

    This new edition reflects contemporary developments in practice research, such as an emphasis on empirical or evidence-based practice; the importance of evaluation within the managed-care environment; the role of social work ethics in practice research; the value of qualitative research methodology for particular aspects of monitoring and evaluation; and the role of computer technology and the use of the Internet.

  • Reshaping Theory in Contemporary Social Work: Toward a Critical Pluralism in Clinical Practice
    Author(s): Borden, William, ed.
    Keyword(s): SW07; SW11; CSWO
    Abstract:

    William Borden's persuasive collection of original essays reaffirms the place of theory in social work practice, showing how different theoretical models, therapeutic languages, and modes of intervention strengthen eclectic and integrative approaches to psychosocial intervention. A distinguished group of scholars and practitioners examine emerging developments in cognitive theory, psychodynamic thought, resilience research and family therapy, psychobiography and narrative perspectives, and conceptions of place and environment in psychosocial intervention. They introduce integrative frameworks for intervention and examine a series of crucial issues in the field, including the role of theory in evidence-based practice, the development of practice wisdom, and the ways in which conceptions of love, acceptance, and social justice influence theorizing and practice.

    The contributors to this volume, each one carefully selected, reaffirm the framing perspectives and core values of the social work profession and identify fundamental challenges and tasks in developing theory and practice. Exploring contemporary yet no less essential concerns, they reflect the richness and creativity of theorizing in our time.

  • Resolving Community Conflicts and Problems
    Author(s): Lohmann, Roger A., and Jon Van Til, eds.
    Abstract:

    Public deliberation and group discussion can strengthen the foundations of civil society, even when the groups engaged in debate share a history of animosity. Scholars have begun to study the dialogue sustaining these conversations, especially its power to unite and divide groups and individuals. The twenty-four essays in this collection analyze public exchanges and the nature of sustained dialogue within the context of race relations, social justice, ethnic conflicts, public-safety issues, public management, community design, and family therapy. They particularly focus on college campuses and the networks of organizations and actors that have found success there. Open discussion may seem like an idealistic if not foolhardy gesture in such milieus, yet in fact the practice proves crucial to establishing and reinforcing civic harmony.

    Roger A. Lohmann is emeritus professor of social work at West Virginia University, where he was the founder of the Nova Institute. He is also president of the theory section of the Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action (ARNOVA), former editor of the Nonprofit Management and Leadership Journal, and the author of numerous publications, including Breaking Even: Financial Management in Nonprofit Human Services and The Commons: New Perspectives on Nonprofit Organizations, Voluntary Action, and Philanthropy.

  • Risk Management in Social Work: Preventing Professional Malpractice, Liability, and Disciplinary Action
    Author(s): Reamer, Frederic G.
    Abstract:

    This all new edition is based on Frederic G. Reamer’s key reference for practitioners: Social Work Malpractice and Liability: Strategies for Prevention. Rooted in his own experiences as an expert witness in court and licensing board cases, the volume introduces the concepts of negligence, malpractice, and liability before turning to the subject of risk management. Drawing and reflecting on recent cases and research, Reamer details a variety of problems in the social work field relating to privacy and confidentiality, improper treatment and delivery of services, impaired practitioners, supervision, consultation and referral, fraud and deception, and termination of service. He also explores the unprecedented confidentiality challenges created by new digital technologies, such as online counseling, video counseling, and practitioners’ use of social networks, and describes current issues relating to HIPAA compliance and access to electronic health records (EHR) and health information exchanges (HIE). Reamer concludes with practical suggestions for social workers named as defendants in lawsuits and respondents in licensing board complaints.

  • Robert N. Butler, MD: Visionary of Healthy Aging
    Author(s): Achenbaum, W. Andrew
    Keyword(s): SW00; SW08
    Abstract:

    Robert Neil Butler (1927–2010) was a scholar, psychiatrist, and Pulitzer Prize–winning author who revolutionized the way the world thinks about aging and the elderly. One of the first psychiatrists to engage with older men and women outside of institutional settings, Butler coined the term “ageism” to draw attention to discrimination against older adults and spent a lifetime working to improve their status, medical treatment, and care.

    Early in his career, Butler seized on the positive features of late-life development—aspects he documented in his pathbreaking research on “healthy aging” at the National Institutes of Health and in private practice. He set the nation’s age-based health care agenda and research priorities as founding director of the National Institute on Aging and by creating the first interprofessional, interdisciplinary department of geriatrics at New York City’s Mount Sinai Hospital. In the final two decades of his career, Butler created a global alliance of scientists, educators, practitioners, politicians, journalists, and advocates through the International Longevity Center.

    A scholar who knew Butler personally and professionally, W. Andrew Achenbaum follows this pioneer’s significant contributions to the concept of healthy aging and the notion that aging is not synonymous with physical and mental decline. Emphasizing the progressive aspects of Butler’s approach and insight, Achenbaum affirms the ongoing relevance of his work to gerontology, geriatrics, medicine, social work, and related fields.

  • Rural Social Work Practice
    Author(s): Lohmann, Nancy, ed.; Lohmann, Roger A., ed.
    Keyword(s): SW07; SW02; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Featuring contributions from practitioners, researchers, and academics, this volume synthesizes and analyzes current trends in rural social work practice and considers the most effective ways to serve rural communities. Contributors consider the history and development of rural social work from its beginnings to the present day, addressing the value of the Internet and other new information technologies in helping clients. They also examine the effects of nonprofit organizations and welfare reform on poor rural areas. Coverage of specific client populations and fields of practice includes services for rural mental healthcare; the chronically mentally ill; healthcare for minorities; and the challenges faced by the elderly in rural areas. The contributors also consider issues affecting gays and lesbians living in rural communities and the role of religiosity and social support in the well-being of HIV/AIDS clients. The book concludes with a consideration of the unique issues associated with educating social workers for rural practice.