Index by Title : G

  • Gang Life in Two Cities: An Insider’s Journey
    Author(s): Durán, Robert J.
    Abstract:

    Refusing to cast gangs in solely criminal terms, Robert J. Durán, a former gang member turned scholar, recasts such groups as an adaptation to the racial oppression of colonization in the American Southwest. Developing a paradigm rooted in ethnographic research and almost two decades of direct experience with gangs, Durán completes the first-ever study to follow so many marginalized groups so intensely for so long, revealing their core characteristics, behavior, and activities within two unlikely American cities.

    Durán spent five years in Denver, Colorado, and Ogden, Utah, conducting 145 interviews with gang members, law enforcement officers, prosecutors, and other relevant individuals. From his research, he constructs a comparative outline of the emergence and criminalization of Latino youth groups, the ideals and worlds they create, and the reasons for their persistence. He also underscores the failures of violent gang suppression tactics, which have only further entrenched these groups within the barrio. Encouraging cultural activists and current and former gang members to pursue grassroots empowerment, Durán proposes new solutions to racial oppression that challenge and truly alter the conditions of gang life.

  • Gangs and Society: Alternative Perspectives
    Author(s): Kontos, Louis, ed.; Brotherton, David C., ed.; Barrios, Luis, ed.
    Keyword(s): SW01; SW03; SW09; SW04; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Compiled by three leading experts in the psychological, sociological, and criminal justice fields, this volume addresses timely questions from an eclectic range of positions. The product of a landmark conference on gangs, Gangs and Society brings together the work of academics, activists, and community leaders to examine the many functions and faces of gangs today. Analyzing the spread of gangs from New York to Texas to the West Coast, the book covers such topics as the spirituality of gangs, the place of women in gang culture, and the effect on gangs of a variety of educational programs and services for at-risk youth. The final chapter examines the "gang-photography phenomenon" by looking at the functions and politics of different approaches to gang photography and features a photographic essay by Donna DeCesare, an award-winning journalist.

  • Gatekeeping in BSW Programs
    Author(s): Gibbs, Patty, ed.; Blakely, Eleanor H., ed.
    Keyword(s): SW09; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Leaders in their specific fields consider the administrative, ethical, and legal aspects of gatekeeping as well as its history and its major issues, legal matters, strategies and processes.

  • Gender and Parenthood: Biological and Social Scientific Perspectives
    Author(s): Wilcox, W. Bradford; Kline, Kathleen Kovner, eds.
    Abstract:

    The essays in this collection deploy biological and social scientific perspectives to evaluate the transformative experience of parenthood for today’s women and men. They map the similar and distinct roles mothers and fathers play in their children’s lives and measure the effect of gendered parenting on child well-being, work and family arrangements, and the quality of couples’ relationships.

    Contributors describe what happens to brains and bodies when women become mothers and men become fathers; whether the stakes are the same or different for each sex; why, across history and cultures, women are typically more involved in childcare than men; why some fathers are strongly present in their children’s lives while others are not; and how the various commitments men and women make to parenting shape their approaches to paid work and romantic relationships. Considering recent changes in men’s and women’s familial duties, the growing number of single-parent families, and the impassioned tenor of same-sex marriage debates, this book adds sound scientific and theoretical insight to these issues, constituting a standout resource for those interested in the causes and consequences of contemporary gendered parenthood.

  • Generalist Practice: A Task-Centered Approach, Second Edition
    Author(s): Tolson, Eleanor Reardon, William J. Reid, and Charles D. Garvin
    Keyword(s): SW07; SW11; CSWO
    Abstract:

    This essential text presents a "task-centered" methodology-a structured, short-term problem-solving approach-applicable across systems at five levels of practice: the individual, the family, the group, organizations, and communities. The second edition offers more information on systems theories and includes case studies and practice questions with each chapter, as well as checklists for each level of practice and exercises to help students monitor their understanding and skill development.

  • Gerontological Practice for the Twenty-first Century: A Social Work Perspective
    Author(s): Richardson, Virginia E., and Amanda S. Barusch
    Keyword(s): SW08; CSWO; SW13
    Abstract:

    Gerontological Practice for the Twenty-first Century meets the need for state-of-the-art information on practice approaches with older patients that are age-specific and empirically based, blend "micro" and "macro" views, and reflect current themes in the aging and social work fields. The book is designed as a text for students and as a professional resource for practitioners. Clearly written, the book offers an expert and comprehensive review of the current literature and focuses on issues relating to the most vulnerable older people. Gerontological Practice for the Twenty-first Century also features case illustrations throughout and brief end-of-chapter questions for review.

    The book has four parts. Part 1 reviews current and classic theories of aging and proposes an original framework for an integrative approach to practice with older people that incorporates both individual and policy-level interventions. The approach is based on current themes such as a life course perspective, heterogeneity, diversity, and inequality. Part 2 covers such common and important psychological problems among older individuals, as anxiety, depression, suicide, substance abuse, and dementia, and describes appropriate, evidence-based interventions. Part 3 considers the social psychological picture by discussing working with older families, end-of-life care, bereavement, and work and retirement. Part 4 focuses on core sociopolitical issues in the lives of older people: economic policy, poverty, health policy, quality-of-life concerns, and social services.

    Current, authoritative, and original, this single-volume gerontology resource will be of valuable use to graduate students and practitioners.

  • Globalizing the Streets: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Youth, Social Control, and Empowerment
    Author(s): Flynn, Michael, ed.; Brotherton, David C., ed.
    Keyword(s): SW03; SW04; SW09; SW02; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Not since the 1960s have the activities of resistance among lower- and working-class youth caused such anxiety in the international community. Yet today the dispossessed are responding to the challenges of globalization and its methods of social control. The contributors to this volume examine the struggle for identity and interdependence of these youth, their clashes with law enforcement and criminal codes, their fight for social, political, and cultural capital, and their efforts to achieve recognition and empowerment. Essays adopt the vantage point of those whose struggle for social solidarity, self-respect, and survival in criminalized or marginalized spaces. In doing so, they contextualize and humanize the seemingly senseless actions of these youths, who make visible the class contradictions, social exclusion, and rituals of psychological humiliation that permeate their everyday lives.

  • Governing Access to Essential Resources
    Author(s): Pistor, Katharina
    Keyword(s): pistor; de schutter
    Abstract:

    Essential resources do more than satisfy people’s needs. They ensure a dignified existence. Since the competition for essential resources, particularly fresh water and arable land, is increasing, and standard legal institutions, such as property rights and national border controls, are strangling access to resources for some while delivering prosperity to others, many are searching for ways to ensure their fair distribution.

    This book argues that essential resources ought to be governed by a combination of Voice and Reflexivity. Voice is the ability of social groups to choose the rules by which they are governed. Reflexivity is the opportunity to question one’s own preferences in light of competing claims and to accommodate them in a collective learning process. Having investigated the allocation of essential resources in places as varied as Cambodia, China, India, Kenya, Laos, Morocco, Nepal, the arid American West, and peri-urban areas in West Africa, the contributors to this volume largely concur with the viability of this policy and normative framework. Drawing on their expertise in law, environmental studies, anthropology, history, political science, and economics, they weigh the potential of Voice and Reflexivity against such alternatives as the pricing mechanism, property rights, common resource management, political might, or brute force.

  • Group Work Practice to Advance Social Competence: A Specialized Methodology for Social Work
    Author(s): Lang, Norma C.
    Abstract:

    Small social groups are fundamental for achieving personal growth, social development, socialization, and the skills of sustaining relevance, relationships, and connections to society. Unfortunately, those who would benefit most from small groups often find themselves unable to achieve membership. Lacking the necessary skills for entry, these individuals may never enjoy the advantages of group membership.

    Advancing a practice methodology that specifically targets the socially unskilled, Norma C. Lang provides much-needed guidance to practitioners helping individuals become part of group life. Grounded in extensive practice, Lang's methodology addresses the special needs and anomalous functioning of individuals who lack the skills to form and use groups. She outlines the unique pregroup processes of socially unskilled populations and provides a methodology for advancing social competence. She also identifies the professional and agency requirements for working with presocial processes. Widely applicable to practice with social work groups, Lang's method greatly expands the literature on social work theory and practice with individuals and groups.

  • Groups That Work: Structure and Process, Second Edition
    Author(s): Ephross, Paul H.; Vassil, Thomas V.
    Keyword(s): SW07; SW11; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Social workers, planners, health professionals, and human-service administrators spend much of their time in meetings, working in and with groups. What meaning does participation in these groups have for members? Some of the events that are most important for members of the various professions, and those whom they serve, take place within these groups. Health and human services depend upon their working groups for their development and allocation of resources, their standards of quality, and the evaluation of their success or failure. In short, these groups are relied upon to come up with creative solutions to complex problems.

    Despite the amount of time spent in meetings, committees, and so on, very little has been written about the skills necessary for effective participation and leadership within working groups. With that in mind, Ephross and Vassil combine innovative group theory and practice in this "how-to" guide for professionals who take a variety of roles within the group. They draw on examples from social agencies, a hospital, a low-income community, and the boardroom, providing practical principles for day-to-day group life based on a democratic model. This revised edition also explores the changes that have taken place in the structure and operation of working groups in recent years and the heightened expectations for groups within large organizations.

  • Growth and Policy in Developing Countries: A Structuralist Approach
    Author(s): Ocampo, Jose Antonio, Codrina Rada, and Lance Taylor
    Keyword(s): IPD; Economics; International Affairs; Development
    Abstract:

    Economic structuralists use a broad, systemwide approach to understanding development, and this textbook assumes a structuralist perspective in its investigation of why a host of developing countries have failed to grow at 2 percent or more since 1960. Sensitive to the wide range of factors that affect an economy's strength and stability, the authors identify the problems that have long frustrated growth in many parts of the developing world while suggesting new strategies and policies to help improve standards of living.

    After a survey of structuralist methods and post-World War II trends of global economic growth, the authors discuss the role that patterns in productivity, production structures, and capital accumulation play in the growth dynamics of developing countries. Next, it outlines the evolution of trade patterns and the effect of the terms of trade on economic performance, especially for countries that depend on commodity exports.

    The authors acknowledge the structural limits of macroeconomic policy, highlighting the negative effects of financial volatility and certain financial structures while recommending policies to better manage external shocks. These policies are then further developed through a discussion of growth and structural improvements, and are evaluated according to which policy options-macro, industrial, or commercial—best fit within different kinds of developing economies.