Index by Title : D

  • Decision Cases for Advanced Social Work Practice: Confronting Complexity
    Author(s): Wolfer, Terry A.; Franklin, Lori D.; Gray; Karen A.
    Keyword(s): SW00; SW07
    Abstract:

    These fifteen cases take place in child welfare, mental health, hospital, hospice, domestic violence, refugee resettlement, veterans’ administration, and school settings and reflect individual, family, group, and supervised social work practice. They confront common ethical and treatment issues and raise issues regarding practice interventions, programs, policies, and laws. Cases represent open-ended situations, encouraging students to apply knowledge from across the social work curriculum to develop problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. An instructor’s manual is available on the press’s website.

  • Delivering Home-Based Services: A Social Work Perspective
    Author(s): Allen, Susan F., ed.; Tracy, Elizabeth M., ed.
    Keyword(s): SW07; SW08; SW01; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Service providers are increasingly called upon to serve clients at home, a setting even a seasoned professional can find difficult to negotiate. From monitoring the health of older populations to managing paroled offenders, preventing child abuse, and reunifying families, home-based services require models that ensure positive outcomes and address the ethical dilemmas that might arise in such sensitive contexts.

    The contributors to this volume are national experts in diverse fields of social work practice, policy, and research. Treating the home as an ecological setting that guides human development and family interaction, they present rationales for and overviews of evidence-based models across an array of populations and fields of practice. Part 1 provides historical background and contemporary applications for home-based services, highlighting ethical, administrative, and supervision issues and summarizing the social policies that shape service delivery. Part 2 addresses home-based practice in such fields as child and adult mental health, school social work, and hospice care, detailing the particular population being treated, the policy and agency context, theories and empirical data, and practice guidelines. Part 3, the editors present a unifying framework and suggest future directions for home-based social work.

  • Designing for Growth: A Design Thinking ToolKit for Managers
    Author(s): Liedtka, Jeanne; Ogilvie, Tim
    Abstract:

    Jeanne Liedtka and Tim Ogilvie educate readers in one of the hottest trends in business: “design thinking,” or the ability to turn abstract ideas into practical applications for maximal business growth. Liedtka and Ogilvie cover the mind-set, techniques, and vocabulary of design thinking, unpack the mysterious connection between design and growth, and teach managers in a straightforward way how to exploit design’s exciting potential.

    Exemplified by Apple and the success of its elegant products and cultivated by high-profile design firms such as IDEO, design thinking unlocks creative right-brain capabilities to solve a range of problems. This approach has become a necessary component of successful business practice, helping managers turn abstract concepts into everyday tools that grow business while minimizing risk.

    Jeanne Liedtka is a professor at the Darden Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Virginia. Formerly the executive director of its Batten Institute, a foundation established to develop thought leadership in the fields of entrepreneurship and corporate innovation, she has also served as chief learning officer for the United Technologies Corporation (UTC) and as associate dean of the MBA program at Darden.

    Tim Ogilvie is CEO of Peer Insight, an innovation strategy consultancy, where he has pioneered contributions to the emerging disciplines of service innovation, customer experience design, and business model exploration. His clients include AARP, Bank of America, Diebold, GE, Hallmark, Hewlett-Packard, Procter & Gamble, Starwood Hotels, and The Hartford.

  • Developing Practice Guidelines for Social Work Intervention: Issues, Methods, and Research Agenda
    Author(s): Rosen, Aaron, and Enola K. Proctor, eds.
    Keyword(s): SW07; SW09; CSWO
    Abstract:

    This book bridges the gap between social work knowledge and empirically based practice. Although there is a significant need for the use of empirically tested and verified knowledge in social work practice, the empirical basis of support is nearly absent from practitioners'considerations as they make clinical decisions in routine practice. The authors advocate the development of readily available, accessible, and professionally sanctioned practice guidelines for use by practitioners, a necessity in the age of managed care and demands for greater accountability, effectiveness, and efficiency in practice. This book features a much-needed discussion of racial and ethnic differentials in relation to practice guidelines and on the relationship between practice guidelines and different aspects of service delivery.

  • Development Cooperation in Times of Crisis
    Author(s): Alonso, José Antonio; Ocampo, José Antonio
    Abstract:

    Leading governments undertook extraordinary measures to offset the 2008 economic crisis, shoring up financial institutions, stimulating demand to reverse recession, and rebalancing budgets to alleviate sovereign debt. While productive in and of themselves, these solutions were effective because they were coordinated internationally and were matched with sweeping global financial reforms. Unfortunately, coordination has weakened after these initial steps, indicating one of the crisis’s adverse effects will be a significant reduction in development cooperation.

    Urging advanced nations to improve their support for development, the contributors to this volume revisit the causes of the 2008 collapse and the ongoing effects of recession on global and developing economies. They reevaluate the international response to crisis and suggest more effective approaches to development cooperation. Experts on international aid join together to redesign the cooperation system and its governance, so it can accept new actors and better achieve the Millennial Development Goals of 2015 within the context of severe global crisis. In their introduction, José Antonio Alonso and José Antonio Ocampo summarize different chapters and the implications of their analyses, concluding with a frank assessment of global economic imbalance and the ability of increased cooperation to rectify these inequalities.

  • Developmental Theories Through the Life Cycle, Second Edition
    Author(s): Austrian, Sonia G., ed.
    Keyword(s): SW11; SW06; CSWO
    Abstract:

    In this bestselling textbook, contributors describe theories of normal human development advanced by such pioneers as Sigmund Freud, Anna Freud, Jean Piaget, Nancy Chodorow, Daniel Levinson, Erik Erikson, and Margaret Mahler. Beginning with infancy, toddlerhood, and preschool, each chapter examines corresponding ideologies concerning maturation and development in middle childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age, while acknowledging that no one theory can encompass all aspects of human development. In-depth analyses of the psychology and sociology of development provide educators and practitioners with insights into the specific social contexts of human behavior and help identify variables and deviations. This second edition features up-to-date empirical information, including additional studies on diverse populations, and a new chapter on attachment theory, a growing area of interest for today's clinicians.

  • Diagnosis: Schizophrenia: A Comprehensive Resource
    Author(s): Miller, Rachel, and Susan Mason
    Keyword(s): SW07; CSWO; SW13
    Abstract:

    The disease is not fatal, but few diagnoses have the capacity to instill as much fear in the hearts of patients and families. Here is a profoundly reassuring book that shows there can be life after a diagnosis of schizophrenia.

    The book includes thirty-five first-person accounts, along with chapters by professionals on a wide range of issues from hospitalization to rehabilitation. Jargon-free and technically accurate, the chapters are short and offer up-to-date information on medication, coping skills, social services, clinical research, and much more. Patients and their families can read the book from cover to cover or skip around and select topics as the need arises.

  • Diagnosis: Schizophrenia: A Comprehensive Resource for Consumers, Families, and Helping Professionals, Second Edition
    Author(s): Miller, Rachel; Mason, Susan E.
    Keyword(s): SW13
    Abstract:

    In this book, thirty-five young, recently diagnosed patients speak about schizophrenia and the process of recovery, while two specialists illuminate the medical science, psychoeducation, and therapeutic needs of those coping with the illness, as well as access to medical benefits and community resources. A remarkably inclusive guide, the volume informs patients, families, friends, and professionals, detailing the possible causes of schizophrenia, medications and side effects, the functioning of the brain, and the value of rehabilitation and other services.

    In their dialogues, participants confront shame, stigma, substance use, and relapse issues and the necessity of healthy eating, safe sex practices, and coping skills during recovery. Clinicians elaborate on the symptoms of schizophrenia, such as violent and suicidal thoughts, delusions, hallucinations, memory and concentration problems, trouble getting motivated or organized, and anxiety and mood disorders. Adopting an uplifting tone of manageability, the participants, authors, and clinicians of this volume offer more than advice—they prescribe hope.

  • Dictionary of Psychopathology
    Author(s): Kellerman, Henry
    Keyword(s): SW11; CSWO; SW13
    Abstract:

    Psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, psychiatric nurses, theoreticians, practitioners, and other allied professionals who together represent the entire arc of the mental health field must be versed in psychopathology, the study of mental and emotional phenomena, abnormal psychology, and specific symptoms and behaviors.

    Building a reference that speaks to all of these professions and subjects, Henry Kellerman assembles the first dictionary to focus exclusively on psychopathology, featuring more than two thousand entries (over fifteen hundred primary and more than five hundred subentries) on specific symptoms and disorders, general syndromes, facets of personality structure, and diagnosis. He also includes a sampling of benchmark contributions by theoreticians and researchers that cover the history of psychopathology. These contributions reflect those of a psychodynamic nature as well as cognitive and behavioral approaches, and represent the relatively new field of neuropsychoanalysis as well. This branch of neuroscience is concerned with the relation between the brain and the mind, specifically with reference to brain architecture and function.

    Monitored by a distinguished editorial board, the Dictionary of Psychopathology mostly adheres to the latest DSM nomenclature while also retaining useful residual diagnoses of previous DSM formulations, as well as diagnostic formulations outside of traditional nosologies. The aim of the Dictionary is to broadly contribute to the synthesis of psychopathology.

  • Domestic Violence: Intersectionality and Culturally Competent Practice
    Author(s): Lockhart, Lettie L., ed.; Danis, Fran S., ed.
    Abstract:

    In Domestic Violence: Intersectionality and Culturally Competent Practice, experts working with twelve unique groups of domestic abuse survivors provide the latest research on their populations and use a case study approach to demonstrate culturally sensitive intervention strategies. Chapters focus on African Americans, Native Americans, Latinas, Asian and Pacific Island communities, persons with disabilities, immigrants and refugees, women in later life, LGBT survivors, and military families. They address domestic violence in rural environments and among teens, as well as the role of religion in shaping attitudes and behavior.

    Lettie L. Lockhart and Fran S. Danis are editors of the Council of Social Work Education's popular teaching modules on domestic violence and founding co-chairs of the CSWE symposium on violence against women and children. In their introduction, they provide a thorough overview of intersectionality, culturally competent practice, and domestic violence and basic practice strategies, such as universal screening, risk assessment, and safety planning. They follow with collaborative chapters on specific populations demonstrating the value of generalist social work practice, including developing respectful relationships that define issues from the survivor's perspective; collecting and assessing data; setting goals and contracting; identifying culturally specific interventions; implementing culturally appropriate courses of action; participating in community-level strategies; and advocating for improved policies and funding at local, state, and federal levels. Featuring resources applicable to both practitioners and clients, Domestic Violence forms an effective tool for analysis and action.

  • Dying, Death, and Bereavement in Social Work Practice: Decision Cases for Advanced Practice
    Author(s): Wolfer, Terry A., and Vicki M. Runnion
    Abstract:

    Practitioners who work with clients at the end of their lives face difficult decisions concerning the client's self-determination, the kind of death he or she will have, and the prolongation of life. They must also remain sensitive to the beliefs and needs of family members and the legal, ethical, and spiritual ramifications of the client's death. Featuring twenty-three decision cases based on interviews with professional social workers, this unique volume allows students to wrestle with the often incomplete and conflicting information, ethical issues, and time constraints of actual cases. Instead of offering easy solutions, this book provides detailed accounts that provoke stimulating debates among students, enabling them to confront their own responses, beliefs, and uncertainties to hone their critical thinking and decision making skills for professional practice.

    *Please note: Teaching Notes for this volume will be available from Electronic Hallway in Spring 2010.

    To access the Teaching Notes, you must first become a member of the Electronic Hallway. The main Electronic Hallway web page is at https://hallway.org/index.php. To join, click Become a Hallway Member in the Get Involved category or point your browser directly to https://hallway.org/involved/join.php and provide the required information.

    After your instructor status has been confirmed, you will receive an e-mail granting access to the Electronic Hallway. Once logged on to Electronic Hallway as a member, click Case Search in the Cases and Resources category on the main web page. Enter "death, dying, bereavement" (without the quotation marks) in the search box, select "all of the words" in the drop down menu, and click Submit. The search process will generate a list of Teaching Notes for cases from Dying, Death, and Bereavement in Social Work Practice: Decision Cases for Advanced Practice.