Index by Authors : B

  • Baker, Amy J. L.; Charvat, Benjamin J.
    Title: Research Methods in Child Welfare
    Abstract:

    Social service agencies are facing the same expectations in quality management and outcomes as private companies, compelling staff members and researchers to provide and interpret valid and useful research to stakeholders at all levels in the field. Child welfare agencies are particularly scrutinized. In this textbook, two highly experienced researchers offer the best techniques for conducting sound research in the field. Covering not only the methodological challenges but also the real-life constraints of research in child welfare settings, Amy J. L. Baker and Benjamin J. Charvat present a volume that can be used both for general research methods and as a practical guide for conducting research in the field of child welfare.

    Baker and Charvat devote an entire chapter to ethical issues involved in researching children and their families and the limits of confidentiality within this population. They weave a discussion of ethics throughout the book, and each chapter begins with a scenario that presents a question or problem to work through, enabling readers to fully grasp the methods in the context of a specific setting or area of concern. Special sections concentrate on the value of continuous quality-improvement activities, which enable the collection and analysis of data outside of the strictures of publishable research, and the implementation of program evaluations, which can be helpful in obtaining further research and programmatic funding.

  • Balgopal, Pallassana R., ed.
    Title: Social Work Practice with Immigrants and Refugees
    Abstract:

    The United States has always been a land of immigrants and a destination for refugees. With the increase in immigration in the late 1980s-when the number of refugees entering the United States nearly doubled as well-the number of clients needing social work services rose dramatically. Social Work Practice with Immigrants and Refugees takes an ecological systems perspective on working with these two distinct groups, paying special attention to the relationship between individuals and their social environment.

    Focusing on the major immigrant groups who have come to the United States since the 1965 Immigration Act, the book contains chapters on immigrants and refugees from Asia, Latin America, Europe, and Africa. Pallassana R. Balgopal and contributors explore ideas, concepts, and skills that will help human service workers, social workers, helping professionals, and policymakers deepen their understanding of cultural attitudes toward newly arrived immigrants and refugees, thus strengthening their ability to better serve an ethnically diverse clientele.

  • Barthalon, Eric
    Title: Uncertainty, Expectations, and Financial Instability: Reviving Allais’s Lost Theory of Psychological Time
    Abstract:

    Eric Barthalon applies the neglected theory of psychological time and memory decay of Nobel Prize–winning economist Maurice Allais (1911–2010) to model investors’ psychology in the present context of recurrent financial crises. Shaped by the behavior of the demand for money during episodes of hyperinflation, Allais’s theory proves economic agents perceive the flow of clocks’ time and forget the past at a context-dependent pace: rapidly in the presence of persistent and accelerating inflation and slowly in the event of the opposite situation. Barthalon recasts Allais’s work as a general theory of “expectations” under uncertainty, closing the gap between economic theory and investors’ behavior.

    Barthalon extends Allais’s theory to the field of financial instability, demonstrating its relevance to nominal interest rates in a variety of empirical scenarios and the positive nonlinear feedback that exists between asset price inflation and the demand for risky assets. Reviewing the works of the leading protagonists in the expectations controversy, Barthalon exposes the limitations of adaptive and rational expectations models and, by means of the perceived risk of loss, calls attention to the speculative bubbles that lacked the positive displacement discussed in Kindleberger’s model of financial crises. He ultimately extrapolates Allaisian theory into a pragmatic approach to investor behavior and the natural instability of financial markets. He concludes with the policy implications for governments and regulators. Balanced and coherent, this book will be invaluable to researchers working in macreconomics, financial economics, behavioral finance, decision theory, and the history of economic thought.

  • Basham, Kathryn Karusaitis; Miehls, Dennis
    Title: Transforming the Legacy: Couple Therapy with Survivors of Childhood Trauma
    Abstract:

    To serve the increasing numbers of individuals who have survived interpersonal and domestic violence, or as refugees, have sought asylum from political violence, armed conflict, or torture, Transforming the Legacy presents an innovative relationship-based and culturally informed couple therapy practice model that is grounded in a synthesis of psychological and social theories. This unique couple therapy model encompasses three phases of clinical practice: Phase I entails a process of establishing safety, stabilization, and a context for changing legacies of emotional, sexual, and/or physical abuse. Phase II guides reflection on the trauma narrative. The goal of phase III is to consolidate new perspectives, attitudes, and behaviors.

    Within these phases, the model-illustrated with rich case studies-focuses on specific issues, including: intersubjectivity between the client and clinician (such as transference and countertransference, vicarious traumatization, and racial identity development); intrapersonal, interactional, and institutional factors; the role of the "victim-victimizer-bystander" dynamic in the couple and therapeutic relationships; preserving a locus of control with clients; flexibility in decisionmaking regarding clinical processes; and specific practice themes, such as the composition of a couple, the role of violence, parenting, sexuality, affairs, dual diagnoses, and dissociation.

    A dramatic departure from formulaic therapeutic approaches, this biopsychosocial model emphasizes the crafting of specific treatment plans and specific clinical interventions to show how couple therapy can transform the legacies of childhood traumatic events for a wide range of populations, including military couples and families, gay lesbian/bisexual/transgendered couples and families, and immigrant and refugee couples and families. This thorough attention to issues of cultural diversity distinguish Transforming the Legacy from the current literature and make it an invaluable resource for clinicians in a wide range of professional disciplines.

  • Beckett, Joyce O.
    Title: Lifting Our Voices: The Journeys Into Family Caregiving of Professional Social Workers
    Abstract:

    Lifting Our Voices is the only book to explore the dual roles of professional social workers who are also family caregivers and the only collection on caregiving in which the majority of contributors are African American. After discussing the relevant literature, Lifting Our Voices vividly and sensitively presents the caregiving experiences of ten professional social workers. Using professional and theoretical knowledge and skills, each contributor draws implications for various levels of social work and human service interventions. These poignant descriptions and analyses recount both the frustrations and barriers of negotiating social service agencies and other institutions and the joys and triumphs of family caregiving. Lifting Our Voices frankly discusses how a professional education either prepares or fails to equip an individual with the skills for successful intervention on behalf of a loved one. Contributors hail from rich and varied backgrounds, revealing the importance of age, ethnicity, gender, marital status, and gerontological expertise in the practice of family caregiving.

    These essays explore situations rarely reported on in the literature, such as caregivers and care recipients who represent the lifespan from preschool to retirement. Lifting Our Voices graphically describes types of caregiving that are seldom discussed, including simultaneous caregiving to multiple family members and reciprocal and sequential caregiving, thus broadening and refining the very concepts of "caregiving" and "family."

  • Beemyn, Genny; Rankin, Susan
    Title: The Lives of Transgender People
    Abstract:

    Responding to a critical need for greater perspectives on transgender life in the United States, Genny Beemyn and Susan (Sue) Rankin apply their extensive expertise to a groundbreaking survey—one of the largest ever conducted in the U.S.—on gender development and identity-making among transsexual women, transsexual men, crossdressers, and genderqueer individuals. With nearly 3,500 participants, the survey is remarkably diverse, and with more than 400 follow-up interviews, the data offers limitless opportunities for research and interpretation.

    Beemyn and Rankin track the formation of gender identity across individuals and groups, beginning in childhood and marking the "touchstones" that led participants to identify as transgender. They explore when and how participants noted a feeling of difference because of their gender, the issues that caused them to feel uncertain about their gender identities, the factors that encouraged them to embrace a transgender identity, and the steps they have taken to meet other transgender individuals. Beemyn and Rankin's findings expose the kinds of discrimination and harassment experienced by participants in the U.S. and the psychological toll of living in secrecy and fear. They discover that despite increasing recognition by the public of transgender individuals and a growing rights movement, these populations continue to face bias, violence, and social and economic disenfranchisement. Grounded in empirical data yet rich with human testimony, The Lives of Transgender People adds uncommon depth to the literature on this subject and introduces fresh pathways for future research.

    Genny Beemyn, the director of the Stonewall Center at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, is a leading expert on the experiences of transgender people in the United States and on the development of transgender-inclusive college policies and practices. A gender nonconforming individual, Dr. Beemyn has published and spoken extensively on the needs of transgender students, and hir publications include Creating a Place for Ourselves: Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Community Histories and Queer Studies: A Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Anthology.

    Susan (Sue) Rankin is an associate professor at The Pennsylvania State University and a senior research associate at the Center for the Study of Higher Education. She has presented and published widely on the impact of sexism, racism, genderism, and heterosexism in the academy and intercollegiate athletics. Her recent publications include the 2010 State of Higher Education for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People and Our Place on Campus: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Services and Programs in Higher Education.

  • Bell, Joyce M.
    Title: The Black Power Movement and American Social Work
    Abstract:

    The Black Power movement has often been portrayed in history and popular culture as the quintessential “bad boy” of modern black movement making in America. Yet this image misses the full extent of Black Power’s contributions to U.S. society, especially in regard to black professionals in social work.

    Relying on extensive archival research and oral history interviews, this study follows two groups of black social workers in the 1960s and 1970s as they mobilized Black Power ideas, strategies, and tactics to change their national professional associations. Comparing black dissenters within the National Federation of Settlements (NFS), who fought for concessions from within their organization, and those within the National Conference on Social Work (NCSW), who ultimately adopted a separatist strategy, this book shows how the Black Power influence was central to the rise of black professional associations. It provides a nuanced approach to studying race-based movements and offers a framework for understanding the role of social movements in shaping the nonstate organizations of civil society.

  • Berzoff, Joan, ed.
    Title: Falling Through the Cracks: Psychodynamic Practice with Vulnerable and Oppressed Populations
    Abstract:

    Psychodynamic theory and practice are often misunderstood as appropriate only for the worried well or for those whose problems are minimal or routine. Nothing could be further from the truth. This book shows how psychodynamically informed, clinically based social care is essential to working with individuals whose problems are both psychological and social.

    Each chapter addresses populations struggling with structural inequities, such as racism, classism, and discrimination based on immigrant status, language differences, disability, and sexual orientation. The authors explain how to provide psychodynamically informed assessment and practice when working with those suffering from mental illness, addiction, homelessness, and cognitive, visual, or auditory impairments, as well as people in prisons, in orphanages, and on child welfare. The volume supports the idea that becoming aware of ourselves helps us understand ourselves: a key approach for helping clients contain and name their feelings, deal with desire and conflict, achieve self-regulation and self-esteem, and alter attachment styles toward greater agency and empowerment. Yet autonomy and empowerment are not birthrights; they are capacities that must be fostered under optimal clinical conditions.

    This collection uses concepts derived from drive theory, ego psychology, object relations, trauma theory, attachment theory, self psychology, relational theories, and intersubjectivity in clinical work with vulnerable and oppressed populations. Contributors are experienced practitioners whose work with vulnerable populations has enabled them to elicit and find common humanity with their clients. The authors consistently convey respect for the considerable strength and resilience of the populations with whom they work. Emphasizing both the inner and social structural lives of client and clinician and their interacting social identities, this anthology uniquely realizes the complexity of clinical practice with diverse populations.

    Joan Berzoff is a full professor at the Smith College School for Social Work, where she has twice served as chair of the Human Behavior in the Social Environment Sequence. She has also been codirector of the doctoral program and directs the End of Life Certificate Program. She is the coauthor of three books: Dissociative Identity Disorders: The Controversy and Treatment; Inside Out and Outside In: Psychodynamic Theories and Practice in Multicultural Settings (Editions I, II, and III); and Living with Dying: A Handbook for End of Life Care Practitioners. The author of more than twenty-five articles on psychodynamic theory and practice, women's issues, grief, bereavement and dying, social work education, postmodernism, intersubjectivity, compassion fatigue, and women's friendships, Dr. Berzoff lectures nationally and internationally and has been in private practice for thirty-five years.

  • Berzoff, Joan, ed.; Silverman, Phyllis, ed.
    Title: Living With Dying: A Handbook for End-of-Life Healthcare Practitioners
    Abstract:

    The first resource on end-of-life care for healthcare practitioners who work with the terminally ill and their families, Living with Dying begins with the narratives of five healthcare professionals, who, when faced with overwhelming personal losses altered their clinical practices and philosophies. The book provides ways to ensure a respectful death for individuals, families, groups, and communities and is organized around theoretical issues in loss, grief, and bereavement and around clinical practice with individuals, families, and groups.

    Living with Dying addresses practice with people who have specific illnesses such as AIDS, bone marrow disease, and cancer and pays special attention to patients who have been stigmatized by culture, ability, sexual orientation, age, race, or homelessness. The book includes content on trauma and developmental issues for children, adults, and the aging who are dying, and it addresses legal, ethical, spiritual, cultural, and social class issues as core factors in the assessment of and work with the dying. It explores interdisciplinary teamwork, supervision, and the organizational and financing contexts in which dying occurs. Current research in end-of-life care, ways to provide leadership in the field, and a call for compassion, insight, and respect for the dying makes this an indispensable resource for social workers, healthcare educators, administrators, consultants, advocates, and practitioners who work with the dying and their families.

  • Bisman, Cynthia
    Title: Social Work: Value-Guided Practice for a Global Society
    Abstract:

    This innovative textbook reconfigures generalist social work practice for the twenty-first century. Incorporating historical, ethical, and global perspectives, the volume presents new definitions and explanations for social work concepts and principles in the areas of assessment, relationships, communication, best practices, intervention, and differential use of self. Case studies fully discuss and illustrate the use of these approaches with real clients providing a lens inclusive of geography and culture to promote social justice and human well-being, whether within one’s own nation or across national borders. Recognizing that targeted practice with individuals is the key to successful outcomes, this textbook equips today’s practitioners with the values, skills, and knowledge necessary for social work practice in a globalized world.

  • Bogo, Marion
    Title: Social Work Practice: Concepts, Processes, and Interviewing
    Abstract:

    Social work professionals generally agree that one of the most critical components of the learning process for a practitioner in training is field education, and that the field instructor has the greatest influence on a student's approaching career. In Marion Bogo and Elaine Vayda's text, field instructors will find a model for pedagogy based on the authors' many years of experience both in field and classroom environments. Now in its second edition--completely revised and updated--The Practice of Field Instruction in Social Work remains the only volume specifically intended for use by field instructors. Bogo and Vayda address how the teaching professional can systematically address the critical societal, organizational, psycho-social, and interactive components of social work practice. They discuss all phases of the field educator's work, from student orientation to assessment and contracting, from shepherding students' learning processes to evaluating their work. In addition, they bring to the table the many practical concerns that affect today's teaching professional, including the uses and abuses of the instructor-student relationship, ethical issues, and working with students where differences in age, ethnicity, gender, or disability may be important considerations. This book also includes eight teaching modules, each one a complete curriculum with numerous examples and exercises, for use by field coordinators in the seminar setting and by field instructors. Throughout the modules, Bogo and Vayda present a wealth of case examples drawn from their teaching experience and that of others who have applied their highly effective pedagogical framework.

  • Borden, William, ed.
    Title: Reshaping Theory in Contemporary Social Work: Toward a Critical Pluralism in Clinical Practice
    Keyword(s): SW07; SW11; CSWO
    Abstract:

    William Borden's persuasive collection of original essays reaffirms the place of theory in social work practice, showing how different theoretical models, therapeutic languages, and modes of intervention strengthen eclectic and integrative approaches to psychosocial intervention. A distinguished group of scholars and practitioners examine emerging developments in cognitive theory, psychodynamic thought, resilience research and family therapy, psychobiography and narrative perspectives, and conceptions of place and environment in psychosocial intervention. They introduce integrative frameworks for intervention and examine a series of crucial issues in the field, including the role of theory in evidence-based practice, the development of practice wisdom, and the ways in which conceptions of love, acceptance, and social justice influence theorizing and practice.

    The contributors to this volume, each one carefully selected, reaffirm the framing perspectives and core values of the social work profession and identify fundamental challenges and tasks in developing theory and practice. Exploring contemporary yet no less essential concerns, they reflect the richness and creativity of theorizing in our time.

  • Brandell, Jerrold R.; Ringel, Shoshana
    Title: Attachment and Dynamic Practice: An Integrative Guide for Social Workers and Other Clinicians
    Keyword(s): SW07; SW06; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Contemporary attachment theory both enriches our understanding of human development and informs clinical practice. It examines the relational bonds between young children and their caregivers and traces its origins to several scientific and social fields, most notably psychoanalysis, social work, behaviorism, ethology, evolutionary theory, and biology.

    The first portion of this book examines attachment theory and its relationship to other psychodynamic theories of development, from Sigmund Freud to Heinz Kohut, and then discusses the landmark contributions of John Bowlby, the "father" of modern attachment theory. The section concludes with a detailed summary of research on attachment, highlighting the work of Mary Ainsworth, Mary Main, Allan Sroufe, and Peter Fonagy.

    The second portion focuses on clinical applications with child, adolescent, and adult client populations. Brief vignettes and lengthier case illustrations consider a variety of attachment disorders and treatment approaches, paying special attention to clinical method and technique, process dimensions, and transference and countertransference phenomena. Cases are set in a range of treatment venues, such as college and family counseling services, community mental health centers, and private practice, and involve clients of diverse ethnocultural backgrounds and sexual orientations.

    Researchers have established that children's bonds with their caregivers are rooted in psychological as well as biological motives and have profound effects on later personality development. Attachment and Dynamic Practice offers a clear and accessible introduction to attachment theory and research, linking the field to a broad range of clinical situations and psychodynamic models.

  • Briar-Lawson, Katharine; Lawson, Hal A.; Hennon, Charles B.; Jones, Alan R.
    Title: Family-Centered Policies and Practices: International Implications
    Abstract:

    Analyzing the critical juncture of family-centered policy and practice, this book places the universal institution of the family in a global context. By including a conceptual framework as well as practice components, the authors offer an original multimodal approach toward understanding family-centered policy practice from an international perspective. It provides grassroots strategies for activists and practical guides for both students and practitioners and includes cutting-edge interpretations of the impact of globalization on families, social workers, and other helping professionals and advocates.

  • Brotherton, David C.; Barrios, Luis
    Title: Banished to the Homeland: Dominican Deportees and Their Stories of Exile
    Abstract:

    The 1996 U.S. Immigration Reform and Responsibility Act has led to the forcible deportation of more than thirty thousand Dominicans from the United States, with little protest or even notice from the public. Since these deportees return to the country of their origin, many Americans assume repatriation will be easy and the emotional and financial hardships will be few, but in fact the opposite is true. Deportees suffer greatly when they are torn from their American families and social networks, and they are further demeaned as they resettle former homelands, blamed for crime waves, cultural and economic decline, and other troubles largely beyond their control.

    Following thousands of Dominican deportees over a seven-year period, David C. Brotherton and Luis Barrios capture the experience of emigration, imprisonment, banishment, and repatriation on this vulnerable population. Through a unique combination of sociological and criminological reasoning, they isolate the forces that motivate immigrants to leave their homeland and then commit crimes that violate the very terms of their stay. Housed in urban landscapes rife with gangs, drugs, and tenuous working conditions, these individuals, the authors find, repeatedly play out a tragic scenario, influenced by long-standing historical injustices, punitive politics, and increasingly conservative attitudes undermining basic human rights and freedoms. Brotherton and Barrios conclude that a simultaneous process of cultural inclusion and socioeconomic exclusion best explains the trajectory of emigration, settlement, and rejection, and they mark in the behavior of deportees the contradictory effects of dependency and colonialism: the seductive draw of capitalism typified by the American dream versus the material needs of immigrant life; the interests of an elite security state versus the desires of immigrant workers and families to succeed; and the ambitions of the Latino community versus the political realities of those designing crime and immigration laws, which always disadvantage these poor and vulnerable populations. Filled with riveting life stories and uncommon ethnographic research, Banished to the Homeland relates the modern deportee's journey to broader theoretical studies of transnationalism, assimilation, and social control, exposing the dangerous new reality created by today's draconian immigration policies.

    David C. Brotherton is professor and chair of sociology at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and at the Graduate Center, the City University of New York. His research focuses on social exclusion and resistance, and his most recent book is Keeping Out the Other: A Critical Introduction to Immigration Enforcement Today.

    Luis Barrios is a professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and a member of the Ph.D. faculties in social/personality psychology at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. His research focuses on border studies, psychosocial exclusion, and resistance. Brotherton and Barrios are also coauthors of The Almighty Latin King and Queen Nation: Street Politics and the Transformation of a New York City Gang and coeditors of Gangs and Society: Alternative Perspectives.

  • Burack-Weiss, Ann
    Title: The Caregiver's Tale: Loss and Renewal in Memoirs of Family Life
    Keyword(s): SW06; SW08; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Ann Burack-Weiss explores a rich variety of published memoirs by authors who cared for ill or disabled family members. Contrary to the common belief that caregiving is nothing more than a stressful situation to be endured, memoirs describe a life transforming experience-self-discovery, a reordering of one's priorities, and a changed view of the world. The Caregiver's Tale offers insight and comfort to individuals caring for a loved one and is a valuable resource for all health care professionals.

    Identifying common themes, Burack-Weiss describes how the illness career and social meaning of cancer, dementia, HIV/AIDS, mental illness, and chemical dependence affect the caregiving experience. She applies the same method to an examination of family roles: parents caring for ailing children, couples and siblings caring for one another, and adult children caring for aging parents.

    Jamaica Kincaid, Sue Miller, Paul Monette, Kenzaburo Oe, and Philip Roth are among the many authors who share their caregiving stories. Burack-Weiss provides an annotated bibliography of the more than one hundred memoirs and an accompanying chart to help readers locate those of greatest interest to them.

  • Bussey, Marian, ed.; Bula Wise, Judith, ed.
    Title: Trauma Transformed: An Empowerment Response
    Keyword(s): SW07; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Whether it's physical, psychological, social, historical, or ongoing, trauma is a universal experience, and this book provides professionals with the approaches necessary for successful and empowering interventions across the trauma spectrum. Part one examines the steps individuals take to heal their traumas. Nicolas survives an attack by his own dog; Tay rebuilds her life after years of incest; Claire speaks out about being molested by a program participant at her mental health clinic; and Erma copes with the shattering memories of childhood abuse. Part two focuses on interpersonal dynamics. Frank is held accountable for his violence toward his wife; Erin and her mother confront the reality of bullying and victimization in schools; Beth faces discrimination because of her sexual orientation; and staff members at a transitional housing shelter deal with the death of a client.

    Part three recounts stories of resilience and healing at the social and community level. Salome and her family process the historical trauma of the massacre of her American Indian ancestors. A group of boys who became fatherless after 9/11 respond to experiential ways of coping with their grief. Jennifer and Kim live daily with the social trauma of poverty. Three Liberian families survive torture, flight, refugee camps, and resettlement. Amory struggles to find meaning and move on from his experience as a combat veteran, and the story of Angelina Batiste epitomizes the loss and resilience of those who lived through Hurricane Katrina. Trauma Transformed provides insight into the psychological and spiritual resources practitioners need to help victims move forward and improve upon their circumstances. Readers will also learn to strengthen their sense of self to prevent secondary trauma.

  • Flynn, Michael, ed.; Brotherton, David C., ed.
    Title: Globalizing the Streets: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Youth, Social Control, and Empowerment
    Keyword(s): SW03; SW04; SW09; SW02; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Not since the 1960s have the activities of resistance among lower- and working-class youth caused such anxiety in the international community. Yet today the dispossessed are responding to the challenges of globalization and its methods of social control. The contributors to this volume examine the struggle for identity and interdependence of these youth, their clashes with law enforcement and criminal codes, their fight for social, political, and cultural capital, and their efforts to achieve recognition and empowerment. Essays adopt the vantage point of those whose struggle for social solidarity, self-respect, and survival in criminalized or marginalized spaces. In doing so, they contextualize and humanize the seemingly senseless actions of these youths, who make visible the class contradictions, social exclusion, and rituals of psychological humiliation that permeate their everyday lives.

  • Fortune, Anne E., ed.; McCallion, Philip, ed.; Briar-Lawson, Katharine, ed.
    Title: Social Work Practice Research for the Twenty-first Century
    Abstract:

    Social work professionals must demonstrate their effectiveness to legislators and governments, not to mention clients and incoming practitioners. A thorough evaluation of the activities, ethics, and outcomes of social work practice is critical to maintaining investment and interest in the profession and improving the lives of underserved populations.

    Incorporating the concerns of a new century into a consideration of models for practice research, this volume builds on the visionary work of William J. Reid (1928-2003) who transformed social work research through empirically based and task-centered approaches-and, more recently, synthesized intervention knowledge for framing future study. This collection reviews the task-centered model and other contemporary Evidence-Based Practice models for working with individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations. Essays demonstrate the value of these pragmatic approaches in the United States and international settings. Contributors summarize state-of-the-art methods in several key fields of service, including children and families, aging, substance abuse, and mental health. They also evaluate the research movement itself, outlining an agenda for today's sociopolitical landscape and the profession. This volume inspires practice research to prioritize evidence as a base for the profession.

    For the month of January, we will be offering chapter 2, "Empirical Practice in Social Work," by Anne E. Fortune for free as part of our free chapter of the month offer.

  • Gibbs, Patty, ed.; Blakely, Eleanor H., ed.
    Title: Gatekeeping in BSW Programs
    Keyword(s): SW09; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Leaders in their specific fields consider the administrative, ethical, and legal aspects of gatekeeping as well as its history and its major issues, legal matters, strategies and processes.

  • Kontos, Louis, ed.; Brotherton, David C., ed.; Barrios, Luis, ed.
    Title: Gangs and Society: Alternative Perspectives
    Keyword(s): SW01; SW03; SW09; SW04; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Compiled by three leading experts in the psychological, sociological, and criminal justice fields, this volume addresses timely questions from an eclectic range of positions. The product of a landmark conference on gangs, Gangs and Society brings together the work of academics, activists, and community leaders to examine the many functions and faces of gangs today. Analyzing the spread of gangs from New York to Texas to the West Coast, the book covers such topics as the spirituality of gangs, the place of women in gang culture, and the effect on gangs of a variety of educational programs and services for at-risk youth. The final chapter examines the "gang-photography phenomenon" by looking at the functions and politics of different approaches to gang photography and features a photographic essay by Donna DeCesare, an award-winning journalist.

  • Liedtka, Jeanne; King, Andrew; Bennett, Kevin
    Title: Solving Problems with Design Thinking: Ten Stories of What Works
    Keyword(s): Business; Corporate; workplace; cbsp
    Abstract:

    Design-oriented firms such as Apple and IDEO have demonstrated how design thinking can directly affect business results. Yet most managers lack a real sense of how to put this new approach to use for issues other than product development and sales growth. Solving Problems with Design Thinking details ten real-world examples of managers who successfully applied design methods at 3M, Toyota, IBM, Intuit, and SAP; entrepreneurial start-ups such as MeYou Health; and government and social sector organizations including the City of Dublin and Denmark’s The Good Kitchen.

    Using design skills such as ethnography, visualization, storytelling, and experimentation, these managers produced innovative solutions to problems concerning strategy implementation, sales force support, internal process redesign, feeding the elderly, engaging citizens, and the trade show experience. Here they elaborate on the challenges they faced and the processes and tools they used, offering their personal perspectives and providing a clear path to implementation based on the principles and practices laid out in Jeanne Liedtka and Tim Ogilvie’s Designing for Growth: A Design Thinking Tool Kit for Managers.

  • Liedtka, Jeanne; Ogilvie, Tim; Brozenske, Rachel
    Title: The Designing for Growth Field Book
    Abstract:

    In Designing for Growth: A Design Thinking Tool Kit for Managers (D4G), Jeanne Liedtka and Tim Ogilvie showed how design can boost innovation and drive growth. In this companion guide, also suitable as a stand-alone project workbook, the authors provide a step-by-step framework for applying the D4G toolkit and process to a particular project, systematically explaining how to address the four key questions of their design thinking approach.

    The field book maps the flow of the design process within the context of a specific project and reminds readers of key D4G takeaways as they work. The text helps readers identify an opportunity, draft a design brief, conduct research, establish design criteria, brainstorm, develop concepts, create napkin pitches, make prototypes, solicit feedback from stakeholders, and run learning launches. The workbook demystifies tools that have traditionally been the domain of designers—from direct observation to journey mapping, storytelling, and storyboarding—that power the design thinking process and help businesses align around a project to realize its full potential.

  • Rivers, Caryl; Barnett, Rosalind C.
    Title: The Truth About Girls and Boys: Challenging Toxic Stereotypes About Our Children
    Abstract:

    Caryl Rivers and Rosalind C. Barnett are widely acclaimed for their analyses of women, men, and society. In The Truth About Girls and Boys, they tackle a new, troubling trend in the theorizing of gender: that the learning styles, brain development, motivation, cognitive and spatial abilities, and “natural” inclinations of girls and boys are so fundamentally different, they require unique styles of parenting and education.

    Ignoring the science that challenges these claims, those who promote such theories make millions while frightening parents and educators into enforcing old stereotypes and reviving unhealthy attitudes in the classroom. Rivers and Barnett unmake the pseudoscientific rationale for this argument, stressing the individuality of each child and the specialness of his or her talents and desires. They recognize that in our culture, girls and boys encounter different stimuli and experiences, yet encouraging children to venture outside their comfort zones helps them realize a multifaceted character. Educating parents, teachers, and general readers in the true nature of the gender game, Rivers and Barnett enable future generations to transform if not transcend the parameters of sexual difference.

  • Weinstein, Michael M.; Bradburd, Ralph M.
    Title: The Robin Hood Rules for Smart Giving
    Keyword(s): Business; Development; cbsp
    Abstract:

    The Robin Hood Foundation is a charitable organization focused on alleviating poverty in New York City. Michael M. Weinstein is the foundation’s senior vice president. In that role he developed its metrics-based approach, called “relentless monetization,” to ensure that the money the foundation receives and grants is used most effectively. Ralph M. Bradburd has served as long-time consultant to Robin Hood on matters of metrics.

    In this book Weinstein and Bradburd show how to implement the Robin Hood approach and explain how any nonprofit organizations or philanthropic donor can use it to achieve the greatest benefit from every philanthropic dollar. Drawing on their extensive knowledge, the authors devote specific chapters to the difficulties most frequently encountered by donors trying to measure the benefits of their initiatives.. This book provides straightforward, targeted advice for funding “smart” nonprofit programs.