Index by Authors : ALL

  • ALL
  • Achenbaum, W. Andrew
    Title: Robert N. Butler, MD: Visionary of Healthy Aging
    Keyword(s): SW00; SW08
    Abstract:

    Robert Neil Butler (1927–2010) was a scholar, psychiatrist, and Pulitzer Prize–winning author who revolutionized the way the world thinks about aging and the elderly. One of the first psychiatrists to engage with older men and women outside of institutional settings, Butler coined the term “ageism” to draw attention to discrimination against older adults and spent a lifetime working to improve their status, medical treatment, and care.

    Early in his career, Butler seized on the positive features of late-life development—aspects he documented in his pathbreaking research on “healthy aging” at the National Institutes of Health and in private practice. He set the nation’s age-based health care agenda and research priorities as founding director of the National Institute on Aging and by creating the first interprofessional, interdisciplinary department of geriatrics at New York City’s Mount Sinai Hospital. In the final two decades of his career, Butler created a global alliance of scientists, educators, practitioners, politicians, journalists, and advocates through the International Longevity Center.

    A scholar who knew Butler personally and professionally, W. Andrew Achenbaum follows this pioneer’s significant contributions to the concept of healthy aging and the notion that aging is not synonymous with physical and mental decline. Emphasizing the progressive aspects of Butler’s approach and insight, Achenbaum affirms the ongoing relevance of his work to gerontology, geriatrics, medicine, social work, and related fields.

  • Adelman, Anne J.; Malawista, Kerry L., eds.
    Title: The Therapist in Mourning: From the Faraway Nearby
    Keyword(s): SW00; SW12
    Abstract:

    The unexpected loss of a client can be a lonely and isolating experience for therapists. While family and friends can ritually mourn the deceased, the nature of the therapeutic relationship prohibits therapists from engaging in such activities. Practitioners can only share memories of a client in circumscribed ways, while respecting the patient’s confidentiality. Therefore, they may find it difficult to discuss the things that made the therapeutic relationship meaningful. Similarly, when a therapist loses someone in their private lives, they are expected to isolate themselves from grief, since allowing one’s personal life to enter the working relationship can interfere with a client’s self-discovery and healing.

    For therapists caught between their grief and the empathy they provide for their clients, this collection explores the complexity of bereavement within the practice setting. It also examines the professional and personal ramifications of death and loss for the practicing clinician. Featuring original essays from longstanding practitioners, the collection demonstrates the universal experience of bereavement while outlining a theoretical framework for the position of the bereft therapist. Essays cover the unexpected death of clients and patient suicide, personal loss in a therapist’s life, the grief of clients who lose a therapist, disastrous loss within a community, and the grief resulting from professional losses and disruptions. The first of its kind, this volume gives voice to long-suppressed thoughts and emotions, enabling psychologists, psychiatrists, counselors, and other mental health specialists to achieve the connection and healing they bring to their own work.

  • Akabas, Sheila H.; Kurzman, Paul A.
    Title: Work and the Workplace: A Resource for Innovative Policy and Practice
    Keyword(s): SW09; SW07; CSWO
    Abstract:

    For more than twenty years Sheila H. Akabas and Paul A. Kurzman have written extensively about workers and work organizations, and given leadership to the occupational social welfare movement worldwide. Recognized as leaders in their field, Akabas and Kurzman offer an invaluable and comprehensive look at the innovative ways in which management, labor organizations, government, and social workers can better respond to the needs of workers, their families, and communities.

    The authors consider the social, psychological, and economic conditions in the world of work; the domino impact of unemployment upon individuals, families, organizations, and communities; and the inadequacy of insurance, benefit and support systems, intended to respond to personal and systematic crises. They also provide case histories that illustrate how collaboration among management, labor, social work, and government opens new options for workers, their families, and those seeking entry into the workplace.

    The authors' discussion provides contemporary illustrations of evidence-based best practices that respond to the needs of the modern workplace. They analyze the barriers to entry into the workforce; the tension between work and family obligations; the sometime unsupportive nature of many jobs and settings; and work implications for persons with chronic or acute illnesses. In the concluding chapter, the authors assess current trends as they offer an optimistic review of the possibilities and positive future potential represented by career counseling, pre-retirement preparation, disability management, executive coaching, manpower programming, and managed care. Throughout the book, Akabas and Kurzman include case studies to illustrate innovative practice and provide study questions for each chapter.

  • Alamar, Benjamin C.
    Title: Sports Analytics: A Guide for Coaches, Managers, and Other Decision Makers
    Keyword(s): Business; Corporate
    Abstract:

    Benjamin C. Alamar founded the first journal dedicated to sports statistics, the Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports. He developed and teaches a class on sports analytics for managers at the University of San Francisco and has published numerous cutting-edge studies on strategy and player evaluation. Today, he cochairs the sports statistics section of the International Statistics Institute and consults with several professional teams and businesses in sports analytics.

    There isn’t a better representative of this emerging field to show diverse organizations how to implement analytics into their decision-making strategies, especially as analytic tools grow increasingly complex. Alamar provides a clear, easily digestible survey of the practice and a detailed understanding of analytics’ vast possibilities. He explains how to evaluate different programs and put them to use. Using concrete examples from professional sports teams and case studies demonstrating the use and value of analytics in the field, Alamar designs a roadmap for managers, general managers, and other professionals as they build their own programs and teach their approach to others.

  • Albarus, Carmeta; and Mack, Jonathan H.
    Title: The Making of Lee Boyd Malvo: The D.C. Sniper
    Abstract:

    In October of 2002, a series of sniper attacks paralyzed the Washington Beltway, turning normally placid gas stations, parking lots, restaurants, and school grounds into chaotic killing fields. After the spree, ten people were dead and several others wounded. The perpetrators were forty-one-year-old John Allen Muhammad and his seventeen-year-old protégé, Lee Boyd Malvo.

    Called in by the judge to serve on Malvo’s defense team, social worker Carmeta Albarus was instructed by the court to uncover any information that might help mitigate the death sentence the teen faced. Albarus met with Malvo numerous times and repeatedly traveled back to his homeland of Jamaica, as well as to Antigua, to interview his parents, family members, teachers, and friends. What she uncovered was the story of a once promising, intelligent young man, whose repeated abuse and abandonment left him detached from his biological parents and desperate for guidance and support. In search of a father figure, Malvo instead found John Muhammad, a veteran of the first Gulf War who intentionally shaped his protégé through a ruthlessly efficient campaign of brainwashing, sniper training, and race hatred, turning the susceptible teen into an angry, raging, and dissociated killer with no empathy for his victims.

    In this intimate and carefully documented account, Albarus details the nature of Malvo’s tragic attachment to his perceived “hero father,” his indoctrination, and his subsequent dissociation. She recounts her role in helping to extricate Malvo from the psychological clutches of Muhammad, which led to a dramatic courtroom confrontation with the man who manipulated and exploited him. Psychologist Jonathan H. Mack identifies and analyzes the underlying clinical psychological and behavioral processes that led to Malvo’s dissociation and turn toward serial violence. With this tragic tale, the authors emphasize the importance of parental attachment and the need for positive and loving relationships during the critical years of early childhood development. By closely examining the impact of Lee Boyd Malvo’s childhood on his later development, they reach out to parents, social workers, and the community for greater awareness and prevention.

  • Allen, Susan F., ed.; Tracy, Elizabeth M., ed.
    Title: Delivering Home-Based Services: A Social Work Perspective
    Keyword(s): SW07; SW08; SW01; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Service providers are increasingly called upon to serve clients at home, a setting even a seasoned professional can find difficult to negotiate. From monitoring the health of older populations to managing paroled offenders, preventing child abuse, and reunifying families, home-based services require models that ensure positive outcomes and address the ethical dilemmas that might arise in such sensitive contexts.

    The contributors to this volume are national experts in diverse fields of social work practice, policy, and research. Treating the home as an ecological setting that guides human development and family interaction, they present rationales for and overviews of evidence-based models across an array of populations and fields of practice. Part 1 provides historical background and contemporary applications for home-based services, highlighting ethical, administrative, and supervision issues and summarizing the social policies that shape service delivery. Part 2 addresses home-based practice in such fields as child and adult mental health, school social work, and hospice care, detailing the particular population being treated, the policy and agency context, theories and empirical data, and practice guidelines. Part 3, the editors present a unifying framework and suggest future directions for home-based social work.

  • Alonso, José Antonio; Ocampo, José Antonio
    Title: Development Cooperation in Times of Crisis
    Abstract:

    Leading governments undertook extraordinary measures to offset the 2008 economic crisis, shoring up financial institutions, stimulating demand to reverse recession, and rebalancing budgets to alleviate sovereign debt. While productive in and of themselves, these solutions were effective because they were coordinated internationally and were matched with sweeping global financial reforms. Unfortunately, coordination has weakened after these initial steps, indicating one of the crisis’s adverse effects will be a significant reduction in development cooperation.

    Urging advanced nations to improve their support for development, the contributors to this volume revisit the causes of the 2008 collapse and the ongoing effects of recession on global and developing economies. They reevaluate the international response to crisis and suggest more effective approaches to development cooperation. Experts on international aid join together to redesign the cooperation system and its governance, so it can accept new actors and better achieve the Millennial Development Goals of 2015 within the context of severe global crisis. In their introduction, José Antonio Alonso and José Antonio Ocampo summarize different chapters and the implications of their analyses, concluding with a frank assessment of global economic imbalance and the ability of increased cooperation to rectify these inequalities.

  • Anastas, Jeane W.
    Title: Teaching in Social Work: An Educators’ Guide to Theory and Practice
    Keyword(s): SW11; SW05; SW07; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Drawing from her extensive classroom and field experience, Jeane W. Anastas merges the "practice wisdom" of today's social work educators with contemporary theories on instruction and learning. Built around a teacher- and student-in-situation framework, Teaching in Social Work examines the effect of social issues, professional norms and needs, and various educational settings on the interactions among educators, students, and the subjects they learn. The result is a singular volume that focuses specifically on teaching within the field of social work, identifying the factors that result in effective educational outcomes.

    Anastas draws on the theories and selected research findings of higher education and social work education literature. She illuminates the critical aspects of teaching and learning as an adult, the best uses of different modalities of instruction, and the issues of diversity that influence all aspects of teaching and learning. Her book includes guest-authored chapters on field learning and the latest advances in teaching technology. It also engages with ethics, teaching and learning assessments, and faculty work in full-time social work education.

  • Anderson, Sandra C.
    Title: Substance Use Disorders in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Clients: Assessment and Treatment
    Keyword(s): SW04; SW07; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Internalized homophobia, alienation, poor support structures, and high levels of depression all contribute to substance abuse among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals, with social activity at bars and clubs reinforcing addictive behavior. The threat of bias in treatment programs also prevents many from seeking help.

    An essential resource for human service professionals searching for the latest research on these unique issues, this volume features both state of the art practice methods for treating substance use disorders and up-to-date analyses of sexual orientation and gender identity issues, heterosexism, and the ethical challenges of working with the LGBT community. Sandra Anderson discusses practice with individuals, couples, families, and small groups, as well as practice at the program level. Drawing on case studies with her own clients and from social service agencies that treat LGBT clients, Anderson emphasizes evidence-based treatment models, including motivational enhancement therapy, contingency management, the matrix model, and community reinforcement. Packed with recommendations for effective practice, this singular volume confronts the obstacles faced not only by clients with addictions but also by the LGBT population as a whole.

  • Anderson, Steven G.
    Title: New Strategies for Social Innovation: Market-Based Approaches for Assisting the Poor
    Abstract:

    Market-based development strategies designed to help the world’s poor receive significant support from advocates, academics, governments, and the media, yet frequently the perceived success of these programs rests on carefully selected examples and one-sided, enthusiastic accounts. In practice, these approaches are often poorly defined and executed, with little balanced, comparative analysis of their true strengths and weaknesses.

    This book is the first to assess emerging market-based social change approaches comparatively, focusing specifically on social entrepreneurship, corporate social responsibility, fair trade, and private sustainable development. Steven G. Anderson begins by identifying the problems these programs address and then describes their core, shared principles. He follows with a general framework for defining and evaluating these and other development approaches. Separate chapters provide background on the historical development and application of each approach, as well as interpretations of the processes for implementation and the underlying behavioral assumptions related to successful outcomes. A final chapter compares each approach across a set of important program development dimensions and analyzes the utility of market-based approaches as part of a general consideration of social development strategies for the developing world.

  • Austrian, Sonia G., ed.
    Title: Developmental Theories Through the Life Cycle, Second Edition
    Keyword(s): SW11; SW06; CSWO
    Abstract:

    In this bestselling textbook, contributors describe theories of normal human development advanced by such pioneers as Sigmund Freud, Anna Freud, Jean Piaget, Nancy Chodorow, Daniel Levinson, Erik Erikson, and Margaret Mahler. Beginning with infancy, toddlerhood, and preschool, each chapter examines corresponding ideologies concerning maturation and development in middle childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age, while acknowledging that no one theory can encompass all aspects of human development. In-depth analyses of the psychology and sociology of development provide educators and practitioners with insights into the specific social contexts of human behavior and help identify variables and deviations. This second edition features up-to-date empirical information, including additional studies on diverse populations, and a new chapter on attachment theory, a growing area of interest for today's clinicians.

  • Baker, Amy J. L.; Charvat, Benjamin J.
    Title: Research Methods in Child Welfare
    Abstract:

    Social service agencies are facing the same expectations in quality management and outcomes as private companies, compelling staff members and researchers to provide and interpret valid and useful research to stakeholders at all levels in the field. Child welfare agencies are particularly scrutinized. In this textbook, two highly experienced researchers offer the best techniques for conducting sound research in the field. Covering not only the methodological challenges but also the real-life constraints of research in child welfare settings, Amy J. L. Baker and Benjamin J. Charvat present a volume that can be used both for general research methods and as a practical guide for conducting research in the field of child welfare.

    Baker and Charvat devote an entire chapter to ethical issues involved in researching children and their families and the limits of confidentiality within this population. They weave a discussion of ethics throughout the book, and each chapter begins with a scenario that presents a question or problem to work through, enabling readers to fully grasp the methods in the context of a specific setting or area of concern. Special sections concentrate on the value of continuous quality-improvement activities, which enable the collection and analysis of data outside of the strictures of publishable research, and the implementation of program evaluations, which can be helpful in obtaining further research and programmatic funding.

  • Balgopal, Pallassana R., ed.
    Title: Social Work Practice with Immigrants and Refugees
    Abstract:

    The United States has always been a land of immigrants and a destination for refugees. With the increase in immigration in the late 1980s-when the number of refugees entering the United States nearly doubled as well-the number of clients needing social work services rose dramatically. Social Work Practice with Immigrants and Refugees takes an ecological systems perspective on working with these two distinct groups, paying special attention to the relationship between individuals and their social environment.

    Focusing on the major immigrant groups who have come to the United States since the 1965 Immigration Act, the book contains chapters on immigrants and refugees from Asia, Latin America, Europe, and Africa. Pallassana R. Balgopal and contributors explore ideas, concepts, and skills that will help human service workers, social workers, helping professionals, and policymakers deepen their understanding of cultural attitudes toward newly arrived immigrants and refugees, thus strengthening their ability to better serve an ethnically diverse clientele.

  • Barthalon, Eric
    Title: Uncertainty, Expectations, and Financial Instability: Reviving Allais’s Lost Theory of Psychological Time
    Abstract:

    Eric Barthalon applies the neglected theory of psychological time and memory decay of Nobel Prize–winning economist Maurice Allais (1911–2010) to model investors’ psychology in the present context of recurrent financial crises. Shaped by the behavior of the demand for money during episodes of hyperinflation, Allais’s theory proves economic agents perceive the flow of clocks’ time and forget the past at a context-dependent pace: rapidly in the presence of persistent and accelerating inflation and slowly in the event of the opposite situation. Barthalon recasts Allais’s work as a general theory of “expectations” under uncertainty, closing the gap between economic theory and investors’ behavior.

    Barthalon extends Allais’s theory to the field of financial instability, demonstrating its relevance to nominal interest rates in a variety of empirical scenarios and the positive nonlinear feedback that exists between asset price inflation and the demand for risky assets. Reviewing the works of the leading protagonists in the expectations controversy, Barthalon exposes the limitations of adaptive and rational expectations models and, by means of the perceived risk of loss, calls attention to the speculative bubbles that lacked the positive displacement discussed in Kindleberger’s model of financial crises. He ultimately extrapolates Allaisian theory into a pragmatic approach to investor behavior and the natural instability of financial markets. He concludes with the policy implications for governments and regulators. Balanced and coherent, this book will be invaluable to researchers working in macreconomics, financial economics, behavioral finance, decision theory, and the history of economic thought.

  • Basham, Kathryn Karusaitis; Miehls, Dennis
    Title: Transforming the Legacy: Couple Therapy with Survivors of Childhood Trauma
    Abstract:

    To serve the increasing numbers of individuals who have survived interpersonal and domestic violence, or as refugees, have sought asylum from political violence, armed conflict, or torture, Transforming the Legacy presents an innovative relationship-based and culturally informed couple therapy practice model that is grounded in a synthesis of psychological and social theories. This unique couple therapy model encompasses three phases of clinical practice: Phase I entails a process of establishing safety, stabilization, and a context for changing legacies of emotional, sexual, and/or physical abuse. Phase II guides reflection on the trauma narrative. The goal of phase III is to consolidate new perspectives, attitudes, and behaviors.

    Within these phases, the model-illustrated with rich case studies-focuses on specific issues, including: intersubjectivity between the client and clinician (such as transference and countertransference, vicarious traumatization, and racial identity development); intrapersonal, interactional, and institutional factors; the role of the "victim-victimizer-bystander" dynamic in the couple and therapeutic relationships; preserving a locus of control with clients; flexibility in decisionmaking regarding clinical processes; and specific practice themes, such as the composition of a couple, the role of violence, parenting, sexuality, affairs, dual diagnoses, and dissociation.

    A dramatic departure from formulaic therapeutic approaches, this biopsychosocial model emphasizes the crafting of specific treatment plans and specific clinical interventions to show how couple therapy can transform the legacies of childhood traumatic events for a wide range of populations, including military couples and families, gay lesbian/bisexual/transgendered couples and families, and immigrant and refugee couples and families. This thorough attention to issues of cultural diversity distinguish Transforming the Legacy from the current literature and make it an invaluable resource for clinicians in a wide range of professional disciplines.

  • Beckett, Joyce O.
    Title: Lifting Our Voices: The Journeys Into Family Caregiving of Professional Social Workers
    Abstract:

    Lifting Our Voices is the only book to explore the dual roles of professional social workers who are also family caregivers and the only collection on caregiving in which the majority of contributors are African American. After discussing the relevant literature, Lifting Our Voices vividly and sensitively presents the caregiving experiences of ten professional social workers. Using professional and theoretical knowledge and skills, each contributor draws implications for various levels of social work and human service interventions. These poignant descriptions and analyses recount both the frustrations and barriers of negotiating social service agencies and other institutions and the joys and triumphs of family caregiving. Lifting Our Voices frankly discusses how a professional education either prepares or fails to equip an individual with the skills for successful intervention on behalf of a loved one. Contributors hail from rich and varied backgrounds, revealing the importance of age, ethnicity, gender, marital status, and gerontological expertise in the practice of family caregiving.

    These essays explore situations rarely reported on in the literature, such as caregivers and care recipients who represent the lifespan from preschool to retirement. Lifting Our Voices graphically describes types of caregiving that are seldom discussed, including simultaneous caregiving to multiple family members and reciprocal and sequential caregiving, thus broadening and refining the very concepts of "caregiving" and "family."

  • Beemyn, Genny; Rankin, Susan
    Title: The Lives of Transgender People
    Abstract:

    Responding to a critical need for greater perspectives on transgender life in the United States, Genny Beemyn and Susan (Sue) Rankin apply their extensive expertise to a groundbreaking survey—one of the largest ever conducted in the U.S.—on gender development and identity-making among transsexual women, transsexual men, crossdressers, and genderqueer individuals. With nearly 3,500 participants, the survey is remarkably diverse, and with more than 400 follow-up interviews, the data offers limitless opportunities for research and interpretation.

    Beemyn and Rankin track the formation of gender identity across individuals and groups, beginning in childhood and marking the "touchstones" that led participants to identify as transgender. They explore when and how participants noted a feeling of difference because of their gender, the issues that caused them to feel uncertain about their gender identities, the factors that encouraged them to embrace a transgender identity, and the steps they have taken to meet other transgender individuals. Beemyn and Rankin's findings expose the kinds of discrimination and harassment experienced by participants in the U.S. and the psychological toll of living in secrecy and fear. They discover that despite increasing recognition by the public of transgender individuals and a growing rights movement, these populations continue to face bias, violence, and social and economic disenfranchisement. Grounded in empirical data yet rich with human testimony, The Lives of Transgender People adds uncommon depth to the literature on this subject and introduces fresh pathways for future research.

    Genny Beemyn, the director of the Stonewall Center at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, is a leading expert on the experiences of transgender people in the United States and on the development of transgender-inclusive college policies and practices. A gender nonconforming individual, Dr. Beemyn has published and spoken extensively on the needs of transgender students, and hir publications include Creating a Place for Ourselves: Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Community Histories and Queer Studies: A Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Anthology.

    Susan (Sue) Rankin is an associate professor at The Pennsylvania State University and a senior research associate at the Center for the Study of Higher Education. She has presented and published widely on the impact of sexism, racism, genderism, and heterosexism in the academy and intercollegiate athletics. Her recent publications include the 2010 State of Higher Education for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People and Our Place on Campus: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Services and Programs in Higher Education.

  • Bell, Joyce M.
    Title: The Black Power Movement and American Social Work
    Abstract:

    The Black Power movement has often been portrayed in history and popular culture as the quintessential “bad boy” of modern black movement making in America. Yet this image misses the full extent of Black Power’s contributions to U.S. society, especially in regard to black professionals in social work.

    Relying on extensive archival research and oral history interviews, this study follows two groups of black social workers in the 1960s and 1970s as they mobilized Black Power ideas, strategies, and tactics to change their national professional associations. Comparing black dissenters within the National Federation of Settlements (NFS), who fought for concessions from within their organization, and those within the National Conference on Social Work (NCSW), who ultimately adopted a separatist strategy, this book shows how the Black Power influence was central to the rise of black professional associations. It provides a nuanced approach to studying race-based movements and offers a framework for understanding the role of social movements in shaping the nonstate organizations of civil society.

  • Berzoff, Joan, ed.
    Title: Falling Through the Cracks: Psychodynamic Practice with Vulnerable and Oppressed Populations
    Abstract:

    Psychodynamic theory and practice are often misunderstood as appropriate only for the worried well or for those whose problems are minimal or routine. Nothing could be further from the truth. This book shows how psychodynamically informed, clinically based social care is essential to working with individuals whose problems are both psychological and social.

    Each chapter addresses populations struggling with structural inequities, such as racism, classism, and discrimination based on immigrant status, language differences, disability, and sexual orientation. The authors explain how to provide psychodynamically informed assessment and practice when working with those suffering from mental illness, addiction, homelessness, and cognitive, visual, or auditory impairments, as well as people in prisons, in orphanages, and on child welfare. The volume supports the idea that becoming aware of ourselves helps us understand ourselves: a key approach for helping clients contain and name their feelings, deal with desire and conflict, achieve self-regulation and self-esteem, and alter attachment styles toward greater agency and empowerment. Yet autonomy and empowerment are not birthrights; they are capacities that must be fostered under optimal clinical conditions.

    This collection uses concepts derived from drive theory, ego psychology, object relations, trauma theory, attachment theory, self psychology, relational theories, and intersubjectivity in clinical work with vulnerable and oppressed populations. Contributors are experienced practitioners whose work with vulnerable populations has enabled them to elicit and find common humanity with their clients. The authors consistently convey respect for the considerable strength and resilience of the populations with whom they work. Emphasizing both the inner and social structural lives of client and clinician and their interacting social identities, this anthology uniquely realizes the complexity of clinical practice with diverse populations.

    Joan Berzoff is a full professor at the Smith College School for Social Work, where she has twice served as chair of the Human Behavior in the Social Environment Sequence. She has also been codirector of the doctoral program and directs the End of Life Certificate Program. She is the coauthor of three books: Dissociative Identity Disorders: The Controversy and Treatment; Inside Out and Outside In: Psychodynamic Theories and Practice in Multicultural Settings (Editions I, II, and III); and Living with Dying: A Handbook for End of Life Care Practitioners. The author of more than twenty-five articles on psychodynamic theory and practice, women's issues, grief, bereavement and dying, social work education, postmodernism, intersubjectivity, compassion fatigue, and women's friendships, Dr. Berzoff lectures nationally and internationally and has been in private practice for thirty-five years.

  • Berzoff, Joan, ed.; Silverman, Phyllis, ed.
    Title: Living With Dying: A Handbook for End-of-Life Healthcare Practitioners
    Abstract:

    The first resource on end-of-life care for healthcare practitioners who work with the terminally ill and their families, Living with Dying begins with the narratives of five healthcare professionals, who, when faced with overwhelming personal losses altered their clinical practices and philosophies. The book provides ways to ensure a respectful death for individuals, families, groups, and communities and is organized around theoretical issues in loss, grief, and bereavement and around clinical practice with individuals, families, and groups.

    Living with Dying addresses practice with people who have specific illnesses such as AIDS, bone marrow disease, and cancer and pays special attention to patients who have been stigmatized by culture, ability, sexual orientation, age, race, or homelessness. The book includes content on trauma and developmental issues for children, adults, and the aging who are dying, and it addresses legal, ethical, spiritual, cultural, and social class issues as core factors in the assessment of and work with the dying. It explores interdisciplinary teamwork, supervision, and the organizational and financing contexts in which dying occurs. Current research in end-of-life care, ways to provide leadership in the field, and a call for compassion, insight, and respect for the dying makes this an indispensable resource for social workers, healthcare educators, administrators, consultants, advocates, and practitioners who work with the dying and their families.

  • Bisman, Cynthia
    Title: Social Work: Value-Guided Practice for a Global Society
    Abstract:

    This innovative textbook reconfigures generalist social work practice for the twenty-first century. Incorporating historical, ethical, and global perspectives, the volume presents new definitions and explanations for social work concepts and principles in the areas of assessment, relationships, communication, best practices, intervention, and differential use of self. Case studies fully discuss and illustrate the use of these approaches with real clients providing a lens inclusive of geography and culture to promote social justice and human well-being, whether within one’s own nation or across national borders. Recognizing that targeted practice with individuals is the key to successful outcomes, this textbook equips today’s practitioners with the values, skills, and knowledge necessary for social work practice in a globalized world.

  • Bogo, Marion
    Title: Social Work Practice: Concepts, Processes, and Interviewing
    Abstract:

    Social work professionals generally agree that one of the most critical components of the learning process for a practitioner in training is field education, and that the field instructor has the greatest influence on a student's approaching career. In Marion Bogo and Elaine Vayda's text, field instructors will find a model for pedagogy based on the authors' many years of experience both in field and classroom environments. Now in its second edition--completely revised and updated--The Practice of Field Instruction in Social Work remains the only volume specifically intended for use by field instructors. Bogo and Vayda address how the teaching professional can systematically address the critical societal, organizational, psycho-social, and interactive components of social work practice. They discuss all phases of the field educator's work, from student orientation to assessment and contracting, from shepherding students' learning processes to evaluating their work. In addition, they bring to the table the many practical concerns that affect today's teaching professional, including the uses and abuses of the instructor-student relationship, ethical issues, and working with students where differences in age, ethnicity, gender, or disability may be important considerations. This book also includes eight teaching modules, each one a complete curriculum with numerous examples and exercises, for use by field coordinators in the seminar setting and by field instructors. Throughout the modules, Bogo and Vayda present a wealth of case examples drawn from their teaching experience and that of others who have applied their highly effective pedagogical framework.

  • Borden, William, ed.
    Title: Reshaping Theory in Contemporary Social Work: Toward a Critical Pluralism in Clinical Practice
    Keyword(s): SW07; SW11; CSWO
    Abstract:

    William Borden's persuasive collection of original essays reaffirms the place of theory in social work practice, showing how different theoretical models, therapeutic languages, and modes of intervention strengthen eclectic and integrative approaches to psychosocial intervention. A distinguished group of scholars and practitioners examine emerging developments in cognitive theory, psychodynamic thought, resilience research and family therapy, psychobiography and narrative perspectives, and conceptions of place and environment in psychosocial intervention. They introduce integrative frameworks for intervention and examine a series of crucial issues in the field, including the role of theory in evidence-based practice, the development of practice wisdom, and the ways in which conceptions of love, acceptance, and social justice influence theorizing and practice.

    The contributors to this volume, each one carefully selected, reaffirm the framing perspectives and core values of the social work profession and identify fundamental challenges and tasks in developing theory and practice. Exploring contemporary yet no less essential concerns, they reflect the richness and creativity of theorizing in our time.

  • Brandell, Jerrold R.; Ringel, Shoshana
    Title: Attachment and Dynamic Practice: An Integrative Guide for Social Workers and Other Clinicians
    Keyword(s): SW07; SW06; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Contemporary attachment theory both enriches our understanding of human development and informs clinical practice. It examines the relational bonds between young children and their caregivers and traces its origins to several scientific and social fields, most notably psychoanalysis, social work, behaviorism, ethology, evolutionary theory, and biology.

    The first portion of this book examines attachment theory and its relationship to other psychodynamic theories of development, from Sigmund Freud to Heinz Kohut, and then discusses the landmark contributions of John Bowlby, the "father" of modern attachment theory. The section concludes with a detailed summary of research on attachment, highlighting the work of Mary Ainsworth, Mary Main, Allan Sroufe, and Peter Fonagy.

    The second portion focuses on clinical applications with child, adolescent, and adult client populations. Brief vignettes and lengthier case illustrations consider a variety of attachment disorders and treatment approaches, paying special attention to clinical method and technique, process dimensions, and transference and countertransference phenomena. Cases are set in a range of treatment venues, such as college and family counseling services, community mental health centers, and private practice, and involve clients of diverse ethnocultural backgrounds and sexual orientations.

    Researchers have established that children's bonds with their caregivers are rooted in psychological as well as biological motives and have profound effects on later personality development. Attachment and Dynamic Practice offers a clear and accessible introduction to attachment theory and research, linking the field to a broad range of clinical situations and psychodynamic models.

  • Briar-Lawson, Katharine; Lawson, Hal A.; Hennon, Charles B.; Jones, Alan R.
    Title: Family-Centered Policies and Practices: International Implications
    Abstract:

    Analyzing the critical juncture of family-centered policy and practice, this book places the universal institution of the family in a global context. By including a conceptual framework as well as practice components, the authors offer an original multimodal approach toward understanding family-centered policy practice from an international perspective. It provides grassroots strategies for activists and practical guides for both students and practitioners and includes cutting-edge interpretations of the impact of globalization on families, social workers, and other helping professionals and advocates.

  • Brotherton, David C.; Barrios, Luis
    Title: Banished to the Homeland: Dominican Deportees and Their Stories of Exile
    Abstract:

    The 1996 U.S. Immigration Reform and Responsibility Act has led to the forcible deportation of more than thirty thousand Dominicans from the United States, with little protest or even notice from the public. Since these deportees return to the country of their origin, many Americans assume repatriation will be easy and the emotional and financial hardships will be few, but in fact the opposite is true. Deportees suffer greatly when they are torn from their American families and social networks, and they are further demeaned as they resettle former homelands, blamed for crime waves, cultural and economic decline, and other troubles largely beyond their control.

    Following thousands of Dominican deportees over a seven-year period, David C. Brotherton and Luis Barrios capture the experience of emigration, imprisonment, banishment, and repatriation on this vulnerable population. Through a unique combination of sociological and criminological reasoning, they isolate the forces that motivate immigrants to leave their homeland and then commit crimes that violate the very terms of their stay. Housed in urban landscapes rife with gangs, drugs, and tenuous working conditions, these individuals, the authors find, repeatedly play out a tragic scenario, influenced by long-standing historical injustices, punitive politics, and increasingly conservative attitudes undermining basic human rights and freedoms. Brotherton and Barrios conclude that a simultaneous process of cultural inclusion and socioeconomic exclusion best explains the trajectory of emigration, settlement, and rejection, and they mark in the behavior of deportees the contradictory effects of dependency and colonialism: the seductive draw of capitalism typified by the American dream versus the material needs of immigrant life; the interests of an elite security state versus the desires of immigrant workers and families to succeed; and the ambitions of the Latino community versus the political realities of those designing crime and immigration laws, which always disadvantage these poor and vulnerable populations. Filled with riveting life stories and uncommon ethnographic research, Banished to the Homeland relates the modern deportee's journey to broader theoretical studies of transnationalism, assimilation, and social control, exposing the dangerous new reality created by today's draconian immigration policies.

    David C. Brotherton is professor and chair of sociology at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and at the Graduate Center, the City University of New York. His research focuses on social exclusion and resistance, and his most recent book is Keeping Out the Other: A Critical Introduction to Immigration Enforcement Today.

    Luis Barrios is a professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and a member of the Ph.D. faculties in social/personality psychology at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. His research focuses on border studies, psychosocial exclusion, and resistance. Brotherton and Barrios are also coauthors of The Almighty Latin King and Queen Nation: Street Politics and the Transformation of a New York City Gang and coeditors of Gangs and Society: Alternative Perspectives.

  • Burack-Weiss, Ann
    Title: The Caregiver's Tale: Loss and Renewal in Memoirs of Family Life
    Keyword(s): SW06; SW08; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Ann Burack-Weiss explores a rich variety of published memoirs by authors who cared for ill or disabled family members. Contrary to the common belief that caregiving is nothing more than a stressful situation to be endured, memoirs describe a life transforming experience-self-discovery, a reordering of one's priorities, and a changed view of the world. The Caregiver's Tale offers insight and comfort to individuals caring for a loved one and is a valuable resource for all health care professionals.

    Identifying common themes, Burack-Weiss describes how the illness career and social meaning of cancer, dementia, HIV/AIDS, mental illness, and chemical dependence affect the caregiving experience. She applies the same method to an examination of family roles: parents caring for ailing children, couples and siblings caring for one another, and adult children caring for aging parents.

    Jamaica Kincaid, Sue Miller, Paul Monette, Kenzaburo Oe, and Philip Roth are among the many authors who share their caregiving stories. Burack-Weiss provides an annotated bibliography of the more than one hundred memoirs and an accompanying chart to help readers locate those of greatest interest to them.

  • Bussey, Marian, ed.; Bula Wise, Judith, ed.
    Title: Trauma Transformed: An Empowerment Response
    Keyword(s): SW07; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Whether it's physical, psychological, social, historical, or ongoing, trauma is a universal experience, and this book provides professionals with the approaches necessary for successful and empowering interventions across the trauma spectrum. Part one examines the steps individuals take to heal their traumas. Nicolas survives an attack by his own dog; Tay rebuilds her life after years of incest; Claire speaks out about being molested by a program participant at her mental health clinic; and Erma copes with the shattering memories of childhood abuse. Part two focuses on interpersonal dynamics. Frank is held accountable for his violence toward his wife; Erin and her mother confront the reality of bullying and victimization in schools; Beth faces discrimination because of her sexual orientation; and staff members at a transitional housing shelter deal with the death of a client.

    Part three recounts stories of resilience and healing at the social and community level. Salome and her family process the historical trauma of the massacre of her American Indian ancestors. A group of boys who became fatherless after 9/11 respond to experiential ways of coping with their grief. Jennifer and Kim live daily with the social trauma of poverty. Three Liberian families survive torture, flight, refugee camps, and resettlement. Amory struggles to find meaning and move on from his experience as a combat veteran, and the story of Angelina Batiste epitomizes the loss and resilience of those who lived through Hurricane Katrina. Trauma Transformed provides insight into the psychological and spiritual resources practitioners need to help victims move forward and improve upon their circumstances. Readers will also learn to strengthen their sense of self to prevent secondary trauma.

  • Calomiris, Charles W., ed.
    Title: China's Financial Transition at a Crossroads
    Keyword(s): Business; Economics; East Asian Studies
    Abstract:

    China's increasing role in global economic affairs has placed the country at a crossroads: how many and what types of international capital-market transactions will China permit? How will China's financial system change internally? What kind of relationships will the Chinese government develop with foreign financial institutions, especially with those based in the United States? Can China broker a sustainable partnership with America that will avoid sending economic shock waves throughout the world?

    Drawing on the contemporary research of prominent international scholars, the experts in this volume outline the trajectory of China's financial markets since the advent of reform and anticipate their uncertain future. Chapter authors and commentators include Geert Bekaert, Loren Brandt, Lee Branstetter, Mary Wadsworth Darby, Michael DeStefano, Barry Eichengreen, Campbell Harvey, Fred Hu, Xiaobo Lu, Christian Lundblad, Ailsa Roell, Daniel Rosen, Shang-Jin Wei, Jialin Yu, and Xiaodong Zhu.

    The book begins with an overview of the history of financial-sector development, regulation, and performance and then focuses on the banking sector, discussing the progress, challenges, and prospects of current sector reform. Subsequent chapters describe the role of foreign capital in China's development and analyze the changes in capital flows and controls over time; explore various explanations for China's composition of foreign-capital and foreign-exchange policies, particularly the factors shaping China's reliance on foreign direct investment; and provide an international, comparative perspective on the remarkable growth experience of China and the contribution of its institutional environment to that experience.

    Contributors dispute the belief that stock market listing has done little to reform state-owned enterprises and take a hard look at the exchange rate regime choice for China, considering the potential long-run desirability of flexibility and the appropriate sequencing of reforms in foreign-exchange policy, domestic banking reform, and capital-market openness. The book concludes with a roundtable discussion in which prominent economists, including Peter Garber, Robert Hodrick, John Makin, David Malpass, Frederic Mishkin, and Eswar Prasad, debate the pace of the appreciation of China's currency and the likely consequences of that policy within and outside of China.

  • Caringella, Susan
    Title: Addressing Rape Reform in Law and Practice
    Keyword(s): SW03; SW09; CSWO
    Abstract:

    The first comprehensive book on rape since Susan Brownmiller's Against Our Will and Susan Estrich's Real Rape, this volume probes every aspect of rape law and the discrepancies between ideal law (on the books) and real law (in action). Susan Caringella canvasses the success and failure of reform in the United States, as well as Australia, Britain, Canada, and New Zealand, and assesses alternative perspectives on rape reform, making use of theoretical models, court cases and statistical data. She uniquely delineates a creative model for change while addressing the discretion that undermines efforts at change. This includes charging the accused and plea bargaining, confronting a lack of transparency and accountability in implementing law, and acquiring funding for such changes.

  • Castañeda, Mari; Isgro, Kirsten, eds.
    Title: Mothers in Academia
    Keyword(s): SW00; SW03; SW06
    Abstract:

    Featuring forthright testimonials by women who are or have been mothers as undergraduates, graduate students, academic staff, administrators, and professors, Mothers in Academia intimately portrays the experiences of women at various stages of motherhood while theoretically and empirically considering the conditions of working motherhood as academic life has become more laborious. As higher learning institutions have moved toward more corporate-based models of teaching, immense structural and cultural changes have transformed women’s academic lives and, by extension, their families. Hoping to push reform as well as build recognition and a sense of community, this collection offers several potential solutions for integrating female scholars more wholly into academic life. Essays also reveal the often stark differences between women’s encounters with the academy and the disparities among various ranks of women working in academia. Contributors—including many women of color—call attention to tokenism, scarce valuable networks, and the persistent burden to prove academic credentials. They also explore gendered parenting within the contexts of colonialism, racism, sexism, ethnocentrism, ageism, and heterosexism.

  • Celani, David P.
    Title: Fairbairn's Object Relations Theory in the Clinical Setting
    Keyword(s): SW07; SW11; SW06; CSWO; SW13
    Abstract:

    W. R. D. Fairbairn (1889-1964) challenged the dominance of Freud's drive theory with a psychoanalytic theory based on the internalization of human relationships. Fairbairn assumed that the unconscious develops in childhood and contains dissociated memories of parental neglect, insensitivity, and outright abuse that are impossible the children to tolerate consciously. In Fairbairn's model, these dissociated memories protect developing children from recognizing how badly they are being treated and allow them to remain attached even to physically abusive parents.

    Attachment is paramount in Fairbairn's model, as he recognized that children are absolutely and unconditionally dependent on their parents. Kidnapped children who remain attached to their abusive captors despite opportunities to escape illustrate this intense dependency, even into adolescence. At the heart of Fairbairn's model is a structural theory that organizes actual relational events into three self-and-object pairs: one conscious pair (the central ego, which relates exclusively to the ideal object in the external world) and two mostly unconscious pairs (the child's antilibidinal ego, which relates exclusively to the rejecting parts of the object, and the child's libidinal ego, which relates exclusively to the exciting parts of the object). The two dissociated self-and-object pairs remain in the unconscious but can emerge and suddenly take over the individual's central ego. When they emerge, the "other" is misperceived as either an exciting or a rejecting object, thus turning these internal structures into a source of transferences and reenactments. Fairbairn's central defense mechanism, splitting, is the fast shift from central ego dominance to either the libidinal ego or the antilibidinal ego-a near perfect model of the borderline personality disorder.

    In this book, David Celani reviews Fairbairn's five foundational papers and outlines their application in the clinical setting. He discusses the four unconscious structures and offers the clinician concrete suggestions on how to recognize and respond to them effectively in the heat of the clinical interview. Incorporating decades of experience into his analysis, Celani emphasizes the internalization of the therapist as a new "good" object and devotes entire sections to the treatment of histrionic, obsessive, and borderline personality disorders.

  • Celani, David P.
    Title: Leaving Home: The Art of Separating From Your Difficult Family
    Keyword(s): SW07; SW06; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Why, after a childhood of emotional neglect and abuse, would a man move next door to the very parents who caused him pain? And how can a woman emerge from her mother's control in order to form healthy adult relationships?

    Giving up family attachments that failed to meet our needs as children, David Celani argues, is the hardest psychological task an adult can undertake. Yet the reality is that many adults re-create the most painful aspects of their early relationships with their parents in new relationships with peers and romantic partners, frustrating themselves and discouraging them from leaving their family of origin. Leaving Home emphasizes the life-saving benefits of separating from destructive parents and offers a viable program for personal emancipation.

    Celani's program is based on Object-Relations Theory, a branch of psychoanalysis developed by Scottish analyst Ronald Fairbairn. The human personality, Fairbairn argued, is not the result of inherited (and thus immutable) instincts. Rather, the developing child builds internal relational templates that guide his future interactions with others based on the conscious and unconscious memories he internalized from his primary relationship-the one he experienced with his parents. While a child's attachment to parents who were neglectful or even abusive is not uncommon, there is a way out. Articulate, sensitive, and replete with examples from Celani's twenty-six years of clinical practice, this book outlines the practical steps to leaving home.

  • Chaskin, Robert J., ed.
    Title: Youth Gangs and Community Intervention: Research, Practice, and Evidence
    Keyword(s): SW03; SW02; SW09; SW01; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Although a range of program and policy responses to youth gangs exist, most are largely based on suppression, implemented by the police or other criminal justice agencies. Less attention and fewer resources have been directed to prevention and intervention strategies that draw on the participation of community organizations, schools, and social service agencies in the neighborhoods in which gangs operate. Also underemphasized is the importance of integrating such approaches at the local level.

    In this volume, leading researchers discuss effective intervention among youth gangs, focusing on the ideas behind, approaches to, and evidence about the effectiveness of community-based, youth gang interventions. Treating community as a crucial unit of analysis and action, these essays reorient our understanding of gangs and the measures undertaken to defeat them. They emphasize the importance of community, both as a context that shapes opportunity and as a resource that promotes positive youth engagement. Covering key themes and debates, this book explores the role of social capital and collective efficacy in informing youth gang intervention and evaluation, the importance of focusing on youth development within the context of community opportunities and pressures, and the possibilities of better linking research, policy, and practice when responding to youth gangs, among other critical issues.

  • Chew, Donald H., ed.
    Title: Corporate Risk Management
    Keyword(s): cbsp; Business; Economics
    Abstract:

    More than 30 leading scholars and finance practitioners discuss the theory and practice of using enterprise-risk management (ERM) to increase corporate values. ERM is the corporate-wide effort to manage the right-hand side of the balance sheet—a firm's total liability structure-in ways that enable management to make the most of the firm's assets. While typically working to stabilize cash flows, the primary aim of a well-designed risk management program is not to smooth corporate earnings, but to limit the possibility that surprise outcomes can threaten a company's ability to fund its major investments and carry out its strategic plan. Contributors summarize the development and use of risk management products and their practical applications. Case studies involve Merck, British Petroleum, the American airline industry, and United Grain Growers, and the conclusion addresses a variety of topics that include the pricing and use of certain derivative securities, hybrid debt, and catastrophe bonds.

    Contributors: Tom Aabo (Aarhus School of Business); Albéric Braas and Charles N. Bralver (Oliver, Wyman & Company); Keith C. Brown (University of Texas at Austin); David A. Carter (Oklahoma State University); Christopher L. Culp (University of Chicago); Neil A. Doherty (University of Pennsylvania); John R. S. Fraser (Hyrdo One, Inc.); Kenneth R. French (University of Chicago); Gerald D. Gay (Georgia State University); Jeremy Gold (Jeremy Gold Pensions); Scott E. Harrington (University of South Carolina); J. B. Heaton (Bartlit Beck Herman Palenchar & Scott LLP); Joel Houston (University of Florida); Nick Hudson (Stern Stewart & Co.); Christopher James (University of Florida); A. John Kearney and Judy C. Lewent (Merck & Co., Inc.); Robert C. Merton and Lisa K. Meulbroek (Harvard Business School); Merton H. Miller (University of Chicago); Jouahn Nam (Pace University); Andrea M. P. Neves (CP Risk Management LLC); Brian W. Nocco (Nationwide Insurance); André F. Perold (Harvard Business School); S. Waite Rawls III (Continental Bank); Kenneth J. Risko (Willis Risk Solutions); Angelika Schöchlin (University of St. Gallen); Betty J. Simkins (Oklahoma State University); Donald J. Smith (Boston University); Clifford W. Smith Jr. (University of Rochester); Charles W. Smithson (Continental Bank); René M. Stulz (Ohio State University);

    All the articles that comprise this book were first published in the Journal of Applied Corporate Finance. Morgan Stanley's ownership of the journal is a reflection of its commitment to identifying outstanding academic research and promoting its application in the practicing corporate and investment communities.

  • Clifford, Mark L.
    Title: The Greening of Asia: The Business Case for Solving Asia's Environmental Emergency
    Abstract:

    One of Asia’s best-respected writers on business and economy, Hong Kong-based author Mark L. Clifford provides a behind-the-scenes look at what companies in China, India, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, Indonesia, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Thailand are doing to build businesses that will lessen the environmental impact of Asia’s extraordinary economic growth. Dirty air, foul water, and hellishly overcrowded cities are threatening to choke the region’s impressive prosperity. Recognizing a business opportunity in solving social problems, Asian businesses have developed innovative responses to the region’s environmental crises.

    From solar and wind power technologies to green buildings, electric cars, water services, and sustainable tropical forestry, Asian corporations are upending old business models in their home countries and throughout the world. Companies have the money, the technology, and the people to act—yet, as Clifford emphasizes, support from the government (in the form of more effective, market-friendly policies) and the engagement of civil society are crucial for a region-wide shift to greener business practices. Clifford paints detailed profiles of what some of these companies are doing and includes a unique appendix that encapsulates the environmental business practices of more than fifty companies mentioned in the book.

  • Cohen, Sally S.
    Title: Championing Child Care
    Keyword(s): SW01; SW09; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Why has child care legislation developed along its present course? How did the political players influence lawmakers? What do the politics of child care legislation over the past thirty years indicate for the future? Based on more than one hundred interviews with legislators and executive branch officials, archival research, and secondary sources, this book looks at the politics behind child care legislation, rather than analyzing child care as a work and family issue.

    Identifying key junctures at which major child care bills were introduced and debated (1971, 1990, and 1996), Sally Cohen examines the politics surrounding each of these events and identifies the political structures and negotiations that evolved in the intervening years. In addition, Cohen looks at the impact the election of President Clinton has had on child care policymaking, and how child care legislation became part of other issues, including welfare reform, crime prevention, school readiness, and tax policy revisions.

  • Corb, Howard
    Title: Interest Rate Swaps and Other Derivatives
    Abstract:

    The first swap was executed over thirty years ago. Since then, the interest rate swaps and other derivative markets have grown and diversified in phenomenal directions. Derivatives are used today by a myriad of institutional investors for the purposes of risk management, expressing a view on the market, and pursuing market opportunities that are otherwise unavailable using more traditional financial instruments. In this volume, Howard Corb explores the concepts behind interest rate swaps and the many derivatives that evolved from them.

    Corb’s book uniquely marries academic rigor and real-world trading experience in a compelling, readable style. While it is filled with sophisticated formulas and analysis, the volume is geared toward a wide range of readers searching for an in-depth understanding of these markets. It serves as both a textbook for students and a must-have reference book for practitioners. Corb helps readers develop an intuitive feel for these products and their use in the market, providing a detailed introduction to more complicated trades and structures. Through examples of financial structuring, readers will come away with an understanding of how derivatives products are created and how they can be deconstructed and analyzed effectively.

  • Cortina, Jeronimo; Ochoa-Reza, Enrique
    Title: New Perspectives on International Migration and Development
    Keyword(s): IPD; International Affairs; Development; Economics
    Abstract:

    With contributions from leading scholars in international development, economics, political science, and sociology, this collection draws attention to migration’s developmental impacts on sending and receiving societies. Through current case studies, contributors examine the interplay among migration, development, culture, family reunification, human rights, and government, all with the aim of advancing more effective solutions to international migration issues.

    The volume’s multidisciplinary perspective combines theoretical discussions with empirical applications, appealing to both academics and policymakers eager to maximize migration’s developmental impacts. The collection begins with a discussion detailing when and why migration promotes growth and what kind of indicators beyond GDP should be considered. Challenging a number of misconceptions, such as the assumption that redressing poverty and alleviating underdevelopment in immigrant communities are solely economic pursuits, contributors acknowledge the inherent cultural dimension in the migration–development debate and define the contours of a research program that systematically and comparatively weighs the cultural dynamics of development and migration. They also emphasize the role of human rights in reinforcing positive developmental outcomes, how traditional social roles and its developmental impacts are reshaped by the international migration of women and children, and international migration’s developmental impacts within specific geographic regions.

  • Cunningham, Lawrence A.
    Title: Berkshire Beyond Buffett: The Enduring Value of Values
    Abstract:

    Berkshire Hathaway, the $300 billion conglomerate that Warren Buffett built, is among the world’s largest and most famous corporations. Yet, for all its power and celebrity, few people understand Berkshire, and many assume it cannot survive without Buffett. This book proves that assumption wrong.

    In a comprehensive portrait of the distinct corporate culture that unites and sustains Berkshire’s fifty direct subsidiaries, Lawrence A. Cunningham unearths the traits that assure the conglomerate’s perpetual prosperity. Riveting stories recount each subsidiary’s origins, triumphs, and journey to Berkshire and reveal the strategies managers use to generate economic value from intangible values, such as thrift, integrity, entrepreneurship, autonomy, and a sense of permanence.

    Rich with lessons for those wishing to profit from the Berkshire model, this engaging book is a valuable read for entrepreneurs, business owners, managers, and investors, and it makes an important resource for scholars of corporate stewardship. General readers will enjoy learning how an iconoclastic businessman transformed a struggling textile manufacturer into a corporate fortress destined to be his lasting legacy.

  • Delgado, Melvin
    Title: New Frontiers for Youth Development in the Twenty-first Century: Revitalizing and Broadening Youth Development
    Keyword(s): SW01; SW09; CSWO
    Abstract:

    Practical guide and theoretical manifesto, New Frontiers for Youth Development is a vital roadmap to the problems and prospects of youth development programs today and in the future.

    In response to an unprecedented array of challenges, policy makers and care providers in the field of youth dvevelopment have begun to expand the field both practically and conceptually. This expansion has thus far outstripped comprehensive analysis of the issues it raises, among them the important matter of establishing common standards of legitimacy and competence for practitioners. New Frontiers for Youth Development is an overview of the field designed to foster a better understanding of the multifaceted aspects and inherent tensions of youth development.

    Melvin Delgado outlines the broad social forces that affect youth, particularly at-risk or marginalized youth, and the programs designed to address their needs. He stresses the importance of a contextualized approach that avoids rigid standardization and is attuned to the many factors that shape a child's development: cognitive, emotional, physical, moral, social, and spiritual. The key characteristic of youth development in the twenty-first century, Delgado suggests , is the participation of young people as practitioners themselves. Youth must be seen as assets as well as clients, incorporated into the educational process in ways that build character, maturity, and self-confidence

  • Delgado, Melvin
    Title: Baby Boomers of Color: Implications for Social Work Policy and Practice
    Abstract:

    Because researchers often treat baby boomers of color as belonging to one group, quality data on the individual status of specific racial populations is lacking, leading to insufficiently designed programs, policies, and services. The absence of data is a testament to the invisibility of baby boomers of color in society and deeply affects the practice of social work and other helping professions that require culturally sensitive approaches.

    Melvin Delgado rectifies this injustice by providing a comprehensive portrait of the status and unique assets of boomers of color. Using specific data, he grounds an understanding of boomers’financial, medical, and emotional needs within a historical, socioeconomic, cultural, and political context, resulting in tailored recommendations for meeting the challenges of a growing population. His research focuses on African American, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Native American older adults and addresses issues of financial security, employment stability, housing, and health care, which are often complicated by linguistic and cultural differences. Rather than treat baby boomers of color as a financial burden on society and its resources, Delgado recognizes their strengths and positive contributions to families and communities, resulting in an affirming and empowering approach to service.

  • Delgado, Melvin
    Title: Social Justice and the Urban Obesity Crisis: Implications for Social Work
    Abstract:

    Urban America is in the midst of an obesity crisis caused by more than just biology and diet. A number of economic, cultural, and contextual factors are causing this epidemic, which can create chronic health conditions for those least able to manage them. Despite scholars’ best efforts to tackle the issue, the problem persists, largely because its social and economic drivers are so subtle and systemic. By considering urban obesity through a social justice lens, this book is the first to help social workers and others develop targeted interventions for truly effective outcomes.

    Melvin Delgado focuses on urban obesity in populations of color—among the hardest hit in the United States—and dissects the issue from individual, family, group, community, and policy perspectives. After an overview surveying the history of urban obesity in communities of color, anti-obesity policies and programs, and the role of social work in addressing this threat, Delgado moves through the social, ecological, environmental, and spatial aggravators of urban obesity, such as the food industry’s nefarious advertising strategies, which promote unhealthy choices and behaviors; the failure of local markets to provide good food options; the lack of safe spaces in which to exercise; and the paucity of heath education. He analyzes recent, national statistics in terms of obesity among various groups; explores the connection between foodstamps and obesity; and reveals the financial and social consequences of this issue for society as a whole. Delgado concludes with recommendations for effective health promotion programs, such as youth-focused interventions, community gardens, and community-based food initiatives, and a unique consideration of urban obesity in relation to acts of genocide and the integrity of national defense.

  • Denby,Ramona W.; Curtis; Carla M.
    Title: African American Children and Families in Child Welfare: Cultural Adaptation of Services
    Keyword(s): SW00; SW01; SW02; SW04; SW06; SW07
    Abstract:

    This text proposes corrective action to improve the institutional care of African American children and their families, calling attention to the specific needs of this population and the historical, social, and political factors that have shaped its experience within the child welfare system. The authors critique policy and research and suggest culturally targeted program and policy responses for more positive outcomes.

  • Desai, Padma
    Title: From Financial Crisis to Global Recovery
    Abstract:

    Using the same presentation and detail that has earned her such wide-ranging acclaim for her previous books, Padma Desai explains in a course-friendly way the complexities of economic policy and financial reform. She merges a compelling narrative with scholarly research to teach and to engage the reader. Paul Krugman described Desai's 2003 volume, Financial Crisis, Contagion, and Containment: From Asia to Argentina, as the "best book yet on financial crises." Her most recent work on Russian reform was a "pick of 2006" by the Financial Times.

    Desai begins with a systematic breakdown of the factors leading to America's recent recession, describing the monetary policy, tax practices, subprime mortgage scandals, and lax regulation that contributed to crisis. She discusses the Treasury-Fed rescue deals that saved several financial institutions and the involvement of Congress in passing restorative policies. The distinguished scholar follows with an analysis of stress tests and other economic measures and investigates whether the U.S. economy is truly on the mend. Widening her view, she considers the prospects for recovery in North America as a whole, as well as Europe, Asia, and South America, and the extent and value of U.S. and E.U. regulatory proposals. Refocusing on American financial practices, Desai evaluates hedge funds and derivatives, credit default swaps, and rating agencies and discusses whether the dollar can remain a reserve currency. She concludes with a historical comparison of the Great Depression and the Great Recession and a look at the effect of the economic collapse on future American capitalism.

  • Dona J. Reese
    Title: Hospice Social Work
    Abstract:

    The first text to explore the history, characteristics, and challenges of hospice social work, this volume weaves leading research into an underlying framework for practice and care. A longtime practitioner, Dona J. Reese describes the hospice social work role in assessment and intervention with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and the community, while honestly confronting the personal and professional difficulties of such life-changing work. She introduces a well-tested model of psychosocial and spiritual variables that predict hospice client outcomes, and she advances a social work assessment tool to document their occurrence. Operating at the center of national leaders’ coordinated efforts to develop and advance professional organizations and guidelines for end-of-life care, Reese reaches out with support and practice information, helping social workers understand their significance in treating the whole person, contributing to the cultural competence of hospice settings, and claiming a definitive place within the hospice team.

  • Duggan, William
    Title: Strategic Intuition: The Creative Spark in Human Achievement
    Keyword(s): cbsp; Business; Economics
    Abstract:

    How "Aha!" really happens.

    When do you get your best ideas? You probably answer "At night," or "In the shower," or "Stuck in traffic." You get a flash of insight. Things come together in your mind. You connect the dots. You say to yourself, "Aha! I see what to do." Brain science now reveals how these flashes of insight happen. It's a special form of intuition. We call it strategic intuition, because it gives you an idea for action-a strategy.

    Brain science tells us there are three kinds of intuition: ordinary, expert, and strategic. Ordinary intuition is just a feeling, a gut instinct. Expert intuition is snap judgments, when you instantly recognize something familiar, the way a tennis pro knows where the ball will go from the arc and speed of the opponent's racket. (Malcolm Gladwell wrote about this kind of intuition in Blink.) The third kind, strategic intuition, is not a vague feeling, like ordinary intuition. Strategic intuition is a clear thought. And it's not fast, like expert intuition. It's slow. That flash of insight you had last night might solve a problem that's been on your mind for a month. And it doesn't happen in familiar situations, like a tennis match. Strategic intuition works in new situations. That's when you need it most.

    Everyone knows you need creative thinking, or entrepreneurial thinking, or innovative thinking, or strategic thinking to succeed in the modern world. All these kinds of thinking happen through flashes of insight—strategic intuition. And now that we know how it works, you can learn to do it better. That's what this book is about.

    Over the past ten years, William Duggan has conducted pioneering research on strategic intuition and for the past three years has taught a popular course at Columbia Business School on the subject. He now gives us this eye-opening book that shows how strategic intuition lies at the heart of great achievements throughout human history: the scientific and computer revolutions, women's suffrage, the civil rights movement, modern art, microfinance in poor countries, and more. Considering the achievements of people and organizations, from Bill Gates to Google, Copernicus to Martin Luther King, Picasso to Patton, you'll never think the same way about strategy again.

    Three kinds of strategic ideas apply to human achievement: * Strategic analysis, where you study the situation you face. * Strategic intuition, where you get a creative idea for what to do. * Strategic planning, where you work out the details of how to do it.

    There is no shortage of books about strategic analysis and strategic planning. This new book by William Duggan is the first full treatment of strategic intuition. It's the missing piece of the strategy puzzle that makes essential reading for anyone interested in achieving more in any field of human endeavor.

  • Duggan, William
    Title: Creative Strategy: A Guide for Innovation
    Abstract:

    William Duggan’s 2007 book, Strategic Intuition, showed how innovation really happens in business and other fields and how that matches what modern neuroscience tells us about how creative ideas form in the human mind. In his new book, Creative Strategy, Duggan offers a step-by-step guide to help individuals and organizations put that same method to work for their own innovations.

    Duggan’s book solves the most important problem of how innovation actually happens. Other methods of creativity, strategy, and innovation explain how to research and analyze a situation, but they don’t guide toward the next step: developing a creative idea for what to do. Or they rely on the magic of “brainstorming”—just tossing out ideas. Instead, Duggan shows how creative strategy follows the natural three-step method of the human brain: breaking down a problem into parts and then searching for past examples to create a new combination to solve the problem. That’s how innovation really happens.

    Duggan explains how to follow these three steps to innovate in business and any other field as an individual, a team, or a whole company. The crucial middle step—the search for past examples—takes readers beyond their own brain to a “what-works scan” of what others have done within and outside of the company, industry, and country. It is a global search for good ideas to combine as a new innovation. Duggan illustrates creative strategy through real-world cases of innovation that use the same method: from Netflix to Edison, from Google to Henry Ford. He also shows how to integrate creative strategy into other methods you might currently use, such as Porter’s Five Forces or Design Thinking. Creative Strategy takes the mystery out of innovation and puts it within your grasp.

  • Duggan, William
    Title: The Seventh Sense: How Flashes of Insight Change Your Life
    Abstract:

    Flashes of insight—the “Eureka!” moments that produce new and useful ideas in a single thought—are behind some of the world’s most creative and practical innovations. This book shows how to cultivate more and better flashes of insight by harnessing the science and practice of the “seventh sense.”

    Drawing from recent findings in psychology, neuroscience, Asian philosophy, and military strategy, Duggan illustrates the power of the seventh sense to help readers aspire to and achieve more in their personal and professional lives. His examples include Gandhi, Joan of Arc, Starbucks founder Howard Shultz, and executives and students he has taught in his classes. His book presents specific steps in the form of three practical tools to help prepare the mind, see and seize opportunity, and follow through on one’s resolution. Based on Duggan’s perennially popular Columbia Business School course, this book teaches the mental skills and discipline that power the seventh sense.

  • Durán, Robert J.
    Title: Gang Life in Two Cities: An Insider’s Journey
    Abstract:

    Refusing to cast gangs in solely criminal terms, Robert J. Durán, a former gang member turned scholar, recasts such groups as an adaptation to the racial oppression of colonization in the American Southwest. Developing a paradigm rooted in ethnographic research and almost two decades of direct experience with gangs, Durán completes the first-ever study to follow so many marginalized groups so intensely for so long, revealing their core characteristics, behavior, and activities within two unlikely American cities.

    Durán spent five years in Denver, Colorado, and Ogden, Utah, conducting 145 interviews with gang members, law enforcement officers, prosecutors, and other relevant individuals. From his research, he constructs a comparative outline of the emergence and criminalization of Latino youth groups, the ideals and worlds they create, and the reasons for their persistence. He also underscores the failures of violent gang suppression tactics, which have only further entrenched these groups within the barrio. Encouraging cultural activists and current and former gang members to pursue grassroots empowerment, Durán proposes new solutions to racial oppression that challenge and truly alter the conditions of gang life.