Reforming the International Financial System for Development

Edited by Jomo Kwame Sundaram

eISBN: 9780231527279

2011 (392 pages )

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Complete Book Download (pages 1-388)

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Table of Contents (pages 7-8)

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List of Tables (page 9)

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List of Figures (page 10)

Download Acknowledgements
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Acknowledgements (page 11)

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Contributors (pages 12-14)

Download Foreword
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Foreword (pages 15-30)

Download 1. Contemporary Reform of Global Financial Governance: Implications of and lessons from the past, by Eric Helleiner
(pages 31-54)
1. Contemporary Reform of Global Financial Governance: Implications of and lessons from the past, by Eric Helleiner (pages 31-54)

Download 2. Global Liquidity and Financial Flows to Developing Countries: New trends in emerging markets and their implications, by C. P. Chandrasekhar
(pages 55-84)
2. Global Liquidity and Financial Flows to Developing Countries: New trends in emerging markets and their implications, by C. P. Chandrasekhar (pages 55-84)

Download 3. The Global Financial and Economic Crisis and Its Impact on Development, by Jomo Kwame Sundaram
(pages 85-113)
3. The Global Financial and Economic Crisis and Its Impact on Development, by Jomo Kwame Sundaram (pages 85-113)

Download 4. The Unnatural Coupling: Food and global finance, by Jayati Ghosh
(pages 114-134)
4. The Unnatural Coupling: Food and global finance, by Jayati Ghosh (pages 114-134)

Download 5. Policy Responses to the Global Financial Crisis: Key issues for developing countries, by Yılmaz Akyüz
(pages 135-172)
5. Policy Responses to the Global Financial Crisis: Key issues for developing countries, by Yılmaz Akyüz (pages 135-172)

Download 6. Reforming Financial Regulation: What needs to be done, by Jane D’Arista and Stephany Griffith-Jones
(pages 173-198)
6. Reforming Financial Regulation: What needs to be done, by Jane D’Arista and Stephany Griffith-Jones (pages 173-198)

Download 7. The Basel 2 Agenda for 2009: Progress so far, by Andrew Cornford
(pages 199-223)
7. The Basel 2 Agenda for 2009: Progress so far, by Andrew Cornford (pages 199-223)

Download 8. Should Financial Flows Be Regulated? Yes, by Gerald Epstein
(pages 224-247)
8. Should Financial Flows Be Regulated? Yes, by Gerald Epstein (pages 224-247)

Download 9. Financial Services, the WTO and Initiatives for Global Financial Reform, by Chakravarthi Raghavan
(pages 248-272)
9. Financial Services, the WTO and Initiatives for Global Financial Reform, by Chakravarthi Raghavan (pages 248-272)

Download 10. Cross-Border Tax Evasion and Bretton Woods II, by David Spencer
(pages 273-300)
10. Cross-Border Tax Evasion and Bretton Woods II, by David Spencer (pages 273-300)

Download 11. Learning from the Crisis: Is there a model for global banking? by C. P. Chandrasekhar
(pages 301-325)
11. Learning from the Crisis: Is there a model for global banking? by C. P. Chandrasekhar (pages 301-325)

Download 12. The Report of the Commission of Experts on Reform of the International Monetary and Financial System and Its Economic Rationale, by Jan Kregel
(pages 326-343)
12. The Report of the Commission of Experts on Reform of the International Monetary and Financial System and Its Economic Rationale, by Jan Kregel (pages 326-343)

Download 13. Special Drawing Rights and the Reform of the Global Reserve System, by José Antonio Ocampo
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13. Special Drawing Rights and the Reform of the Global Reserve System, by José Antonio Ocampo (pages 344-372)

Download Index
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Index (pages 373-388)

Reforming the International Financial System for Development

The 1944 Bretton Woods conference created new institutions for international economic governance. Though flawed, the system led to a golden age in postwar reconstruction, sustained economic growth, job creation, and postcolonial development. Yet financial liberalization since the 1970s has involved deregulation and globalization, which have exacerbated instability, rather than sustained growth. In addition, the failure of Bretton Woods to provide a reserve currency enabled the dollar to fill the void, which has contributed to periodic, massive U.S. trade deficits.

Our latest global financial crisis, in which all these weaknesses played a part, underscores how urgently we must reform the international financial system. Prepared for the G24 research program, a consortium of developing countries focused on financial issues, this volume argues that such reforms must be developmental. Chapters review historical trends in global liquidity, financial flows to emerging markets, and the food crisis, identifying the systemic flaws that contributed to the recent downturn. They challenge the effectiveness of recent policy and suggest criteria for regulatory reform, keeping in mind the different circumstances, capacities, and capabilities of various economies. Essays follow ongoing revisions in international banking standards, the improved management of international capital flows, the critical role of the World Trade Organization in liberalizing and globalizing financial services, and the need for international tax cooperation. They also propose new global banking and reserve currency arrangements.

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Table of Contents

Reforming the International Financial System for Development