The Right to Know: Transparency for an Open World

Edited by Ann Florini

eISBN: 9780231512077

2007 (376 pages )

View the print version of this title.

Share

| More

Available PDF Downloads

Download Complete Book Download
(pages 1-376)
Complete Book Download (pages 1-376)

Download Table of Contents
(pages 5-6)
Table of Contents (pages 5-6)

Download Foreword by Joseph E. Stiglitz
(pages 7-8)
Foreword by Joseph E. Stiglitz (pages 7-8)

Download Introduction: The Battle Over Transparency. Ann Florini
(pages 9-24)
Introduction: The Battle Over Transparency. Ann Florini (pages 9-24)

Download Part One: National Stories
(pages 25-26)
Part One: National Stories (pages 25-26)

Download 1. India: Grassroots Initiatives. Shekhar Singh
(pages 27-61)
1. India: Grassroots Initiatives. Shekhar Singh (pages 27-61)

Download 2. Toward a More Open China. Jamie P. Horsley
(pages 62-99)
2. Toward a More Open China. Jamie P. Horsley (pages 62-99)

Download 3. Open Government in China: Practice and Problems. Hanhua Zhou
(pages 100-123)
3. Open Government in China: Practice and Problems. Hanhua Zhou (pages 100-123)

Download 4. Central and Eastern Europe: Starting from Scratch. Ivan Szekely
(pages 124-150)
4. Central and Eastern Europe: Starting from Scratch. Ivan Szekely (pages 124-150)

Download 5. The Challenging Case of Nigeria. Ayo Obe
(pages 151-184)
5. The Challenging Case of Nigeria. Ayo Obe (pages 151-184)

Download Part Two: Themes
(pages 185-186)
Part Two: Themes (pages 185-186)

Download 6. Making the Law Work: The Challenges of Implementation. Laura Neuman and Richard Calland
(pages 187-221)
6. Making the Law Work: The Challenges of Implementation. Laura Neuman and Richard Calland (pages 187-221)

Download 7. Prizing Open the Profit-Making World. Richard Calland
(pages 222-250)
7. Prizing Open the Profit-Making World. Richard Calland (pages 222-250)

Download 8. The Struggle for Openness in the International Financial Institutions. Thomas Blanton
(pages 251-286)
8. The Struggle for Openness in the International Financial Institutions. Thomas Blanton (pages 251-286)

Download 9. Transparency and Environmental Governance. Vivek Ramkumar and Elena Petkova
(pages 287-316)
9. Transparency and Environmental Governance. Vivek Ramkumar and Elena Petkova (pages 287-316)

Download 10. Transparency in the Security Sector. Alasdair Roberts
(pages 317-344)
10. Transparency in the Security Sector. Alasdair Roberts (pages 317-344)

Download Conclusion: Whither Transparency? Ann Florini
(pages 345-356)
Conclusion: Whither Transparency? Ann Florini (pages 345-356)

Download Contributors
(pages 357-360)
Contributors (pages 357-360)

Download Index
(pages 361-376)
Index (pages 361-376)

The Right to Know: Transparency for an Open World

The Right to Know is a timely and compelling consideration of a vital question: What information should governments and other powerful organizations disclose? Excessive secrecy corrodes democracy, facilitates corruption, and undermines good public policymaking, but keeping a lid on military strategies, personal data, and trade secrets is crucial to the protection of the public interest.

Over the past several years, transparency has swept the world. India and South Africa have adopted groundbreaking national freedom of information laws. China is on the verge of promulgating new openness regulations that build on the successful experiments of such major municipalities as Shanghai. From Asia to Africa to Europe to Latin America, countries are struggling to overcome entrenched secrecy and establish effective disclosure policies. More than seventy now have or are developing major disclosure policies or laws. But most of the world's nearly 200 nations do not have coherent disclosure laws; implementation of existing rules often proves difficult; and there is no consensus about what disclosure standards should apply to the increasingly powerful private sector.

As governments and corporations battle with citizens and one another over the growing demand to submit their secrets to public scrutiny, they need new insights into whether, how, and when greater openness can serve the public interest, and how to bring about beneficial forms of greater disclosure. The Right to Know distills the lessons of many nations' often bitter experience and provides careful analysis of transparency's impact on governance, business regulation, environmental protection, and national security. Its powerful lessons make it a critical companion for policymakers, executives, and activists, as well as students and scholars seeking a better understanding of how to make information policy serve the public interest.

See below for our purchase options for this e-book. Individual chapters with a BUY button can be purchased for only $5, and any chapter with a FREE button can be downloaded or viewed online at any time.