Share

| More

Columbia University Press
61 W. 62 St.
New York, NY 10023

http://cup.columbia.edu/
(212) 459-0600

CUPOLA: Columbia University Press Online Access

CUPOLA provides quick and easy access to full-text e-books and chapters of CUP’s award-winning academic and trade publications.

CUPOLA allows you to search the full text of books or chapters and link to individual pages for future reference. CUPOLA also offers free access to selected chapters, notes, references, and indexes. Flexible and variable purchase options let you decide how CUPOLA will work best for you and allow you to download e-books or chapters to your computer or view them on your e-reader.

CUPOLA is now offering access to more than sixty titles in Social Work and Business and Economics. In the coming months, we will be adding more titles in these fields and from other subject areas as well.

Special Offer for AEA 2011 Attendees

Click here to redeem the special access code for the Columbia Business and Economics Collection.

New and Best-Selling Titles

  • Creating a Learning Society: A New Approach to Growth, Development, and Social Progress Stiglitz, Joseph E.; Greenwald, Bruce C. Creating a Learning Society: A New Approach to Growth, Development, and Social Progress
    Author(s): Stiglitz, Joseph E.; Greenwald, Bruce C.
    Abstract:

    It has long been recognized that an improved standard of living results from advances in technology, not from the accumulation of capital. It has also become clear that what truly separates developed from less-developed countries is not just a gap in resources or output but a gap in knowledge. In fact, the pace at which developing countries grow is largely a function of the pace at which they close that gap.

    Thus, to understand how countries grow and develop, it is essential to know how they learn and become more productive and what government can do to promote learning. In Creating a Learning Society, Joseph E. Stiglitz and Bruce C. Greenwald cast light on the significance of this insight for economic theory and policy. Taking as a starting point Kenneth J. Arrow’s 1962 paper “Learning by Doing,” they explain why the production of knowledge differs from that of other goods and why market economies alone typically do not produce and transmit knowledge efficiently. Closing knowledge gaps and helping laggards learn are central to growth and development. But creating a learning society is equally crucial if we are to sustain improved living standards in advanced countries.

    Combining accessible prose with technical economic analysis, Stiglitz and Greenwald provide new models of “endogenous growth,” up-ending the thinking about both domestic and global policy and trade regimes. They show how well-designed government trade and industrial policies can help create a learning society, and how poorly designed intellectual property regimes can retard learning. They also explain how virtually every government policy has effects, both positive and negative, on learning, a fact that policymakers must recognize. They demonstrate why many standard policy prescriptions, especially those associated with “neoliberal” doctrines focusing on static resource allocations, have impeded learning. Among the provocative implications are that free trade may lead to stagnation whereas broad-based industrial protection and exchange rate interventions may bring benefits—not just to the industrial sector, but to the entire economy.

    The volume concludes with brief commentaries from Philippe Aghion and Michael Woodford, as well as from Nobel Laureates Kenneth J. Arrow and Robert M. Solow.

  • Risk Management in Social Work: Preventing Professional Malpractice, Liability, and Disciplinary Action Reamer, Frederic G. Risk Management in Social Work: Preventing Professional Malpractice, Liability, and Disciplinary Action
    Author(s): Reamer, Frederic G.
    Abstract:

    This all new edition is based on Frederic G. Reamer’s key reference for practitioners: Social Work Malpractice and Liability: Strategies for Prevention. Rooted in his own experiences as an expert witness in court and licensing board cases, the volume introduces the concepts of negligence, malpractice, and liability before turning to the subject of risk management. Drawing and reflecting on recent cases and research, Reamer details a variety of problems in the social work field relating to privacy and confidentiality, improper treatment and delivery of services, impaired practitioners, supervision, consultation and referral, fraud and deception, and termination of service. He also explores the unprecedented confidentiality challenges created by new digital technologies, such as online counseling, video counseling, and practitioners’ use of social networks, and describes current issues relating to HIPAA compliance and access to electronic health records (EHR) and health information exchanges (HIE). Reamer concludes with practical suggestions for social workers named as defendants in lawsuits and respondents in licensing board complaints.

  • Moral Hazard in Health Insurance Finkelstein, Amy Moral Hazard in Health Insurance
    Author(s): Finkelstein, Amy
    Abstract:

    In this short and accessible book, Amy Finkelstein—winner of the 2012 John Bates Clark award—tackles the tricky question of moral hazard, which is the tendency to take risks when the cost will be borne by others. Kenneth J. Arrow’s seminal 1963 paper, “Uncertainty and the Welfare Economics of Medical Care”—included in the volume—was one of the first to explore the implication of moral hazard for healthcare, and in this book, Finkelstein examines this issue in the context of contemporary American health care policy.

    Showcasing research from a 1972 RAND experiment and her own findings from an ongoing Medicaid study in Oregon, Finkelstein presents compelling evidence that health insurance does indeed affect medical spending and encourages policy solutions that acknowledge and account for this. The volume also features commentaries and insights from other renowned economists, including an introduction from Joseph Newhouse that provides context for the discussion, a commentary from Jonathan Gruber that considers provider-side moral hazard, and reflections from Joseph E. Stiglitz and Kenneth J. Arrow.

  • Domestic Violence: Intersectionality and Culturally Competent Practice Lockhart, Lettie L., ed.; Danis, Fran S., ed. Domestic Violence: Intersectionality and Culturally Competent Practice
    Author(s): Lockhart, Lettie L., ed.; Danis, Fran S., ed.
    Abstract:

    In Domestic Violence: Intersectionality and Culturally Competent Practice, experts working with twelve unique groups of domestic abuse survivors provide the latest research on their populations and use a case study approach to demonstrate culturally sensitive intervention strategies. Chapters focus on African Americans, Native Americans, Latinas, Asian and Pacific Island communities, persons with disabilities, immigrants and refugees, women in later life, LGBT survivors, and military families. They address domestic violence in rural environments and among teens, as well as the role of religion in shaping attitudes and behavior.

    Lettie L. Lockhart and Fran S. Danis are editors of the Council of Social Work Education's popular teaching modules on domestic violence and founding co-chairs of the CSWE symposium on violence against women and children. In their introduction, they provide a thorough overview of intersectionality, culturally competent practice, and domestic violence and basic practice strategies, such as universal screening, risk assessment, and safety planning. They follow with collaborative chapters on specific populations demonstrating the value of generalist social work practice, including developing respectful relationships that define issues from the survivor's perspective; collecting and assessing data; setting goals and contracting; identifying culturally specific interventions; implementing culturally appropriate courses of action; participating in community-level strategies; and advocating for improved policies and funding at local, state, and federal levels. Featuring resources applicable to both practitioners and clients, Domestic Violence forms an effective tool for analysis and action.

  • Community Economic Development in Social Work Soifer, Steven D.; McNeely, Joseph B.; Costa, Cathy; Pickering-Bernheim, Nancy Community Economic Development in Social Work
    Author(s): Soifer, Steven D.; McNeely, Joseph B.; Costa, Cathy; Pickering-Bernheim, Nancy
    Keyword(s): SW00; SW02; SW04; SW09
    Abstract:

    Community economic development (CED) is an increasingly essential factor in the revitalization of low- to moderate-income communities. This cutting-edge text explores the intersection of CED and social work practice, which both focus on the well-being of indigent communities and the empowerment of individuals and the communities in which they live.

    This unique textbook emphasizes a holistic approach to community building that combines business and real-estate development with a focus on stimulating family self-reliance and community empowerment. The result is an innovative approach to rehabilitating communities in decline while preserving resident demographics. The authors delve deep into the social, political, human, and financial capital involved in effecting change and how race and regional issues can complicate approaches and outcomes. Throughout, they integrate case examples to illustrate their strategies and conclude with a consideration of the critical role social workers can play in developing CED’s next phase.

  • Uncertainty, Expectations, and Financial Instability: Reviving Allais’s Lost Theory of Psychological Time Barthalon, Eric Uncertainty, Expectations, and Financial Instability: Reviving Allais’s Lost Theory of Psychological Time
    Author(s): Barthalon, Eric
    Abstract:

    Eric Barthalon applies the neglected theory of psychological time and memory decay of Nobel Prize–winning economist Maurice Allais (1911–2010) to model investors’ psychology in the present context of recurrent financial crises. Shaped by the behavior of the demand for money during episodes of hyperinflation, Allais’s theory proves economic agents perceive the flow of clocks’ time and forget the past at a context-dependent pace: rapidly in the presence of persistent and accelerating inflation and slowly in the event of the opposite situation. Barthalon recasts Allais’s work as a general theory of “expectations” under uncertainty, closing the gap between economic theory and investors’ behavior.

    Barthalon extends Allais’s theory to the field of financial instability, demonstrating its relevance to nominal interest rates in a variety of empirical scenarios and the positive nonlinear feedback that exists between asset price inflation and the demand for risky assets. Reviewing the works of the leading protagonists in the expectations controversy, Barthalon exposes the limitations of adaptive and rational expectations models and, by means of the perceived risk of loss, calls attention to the speculative bubbles that lacked the positive displacement discussed in Kindleberger’s model of financial crises. He ultimately extrapolates Allaisian theory into a pragmatic approach to investor behavior and the natural instability of financial markets. He concludes with the policy implications for governments and regulators. Balanced and coherent, this book will be invaluable to researchers working in macreconomics, financial economics, behavioral finance, decision theory, and the history of economic thought.

  • Baby Boomers of Color: Implications for Social Work Policy and Practice Delgado, Melvin Baby Boomers of Color: Implications for Social Work Policy and Practice
    Author(s): Delgado, Melvin
    Abstract:

    Because researchers often treat baby boomers of color as belonging to one group, quality data on the individual status of specific racial populations is lacking, leading to insufficiently designed programs, policies, and services. The absence of data is a testament to the invisibility of baby boomers of color in society and deeply affects the practice of social work and other helping professions that require culturally sensitive approaches.

    Melvin Delgado rectifies this injustice by providing a comprehensive portrait of the status and unique assets of boomers of color. Using specific data, he grounds an understanding of boomers’financial, medical, and emotional needs within a historical, socioeconomic, cultural, and political context, resulting in tailored recommendations for meeting the challenges of a growing population. His research focuses on African American, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Native American older adults and addresses issues of financial security, employment stability, housing, and health care, which are often complicated by linguistic and cultural differences. Rather than treat baby boomers of color as a financial burden on society and its resources, Delgado recognizes their strengths and positive contributions to families and communities, resulting in an affirming and empowering approach to service.

  • Social Work: Value-Guided Practice for a Global Society Bisman, Cynthia Social Work: Value-Guided Practice for a Global Society
    Author(s): Bisman, Cynthia
    Abstract:

    This innovative textbook reconfigures generalist social work practice for the twenty-first century. Incorporating historical, ethical, and global perspectives, the volume presents new definitions and explanations for social work concepts and principles in the areas of assessment, relationships, communication, best practices, intervention, and differential use of self. Case studies fully discuss and illustrate the use of these approaches with real clients providing a lens inclusive of geography and culture to promote social justice and human well-being, whether within one’s own nation or across national borders. Recognizing that targeted practice with individuals is the key to successful outcomes, this textbook equips today’s practitioners with the values, skills, and knowledge necessary for social work practice in a globalized world.

  • Losing Tim: How Our Health and Education Systems Failed My Son with Schizophrenia Gionfriddo, Paul Losing Tim: How Our Health and Education Systems Failed My Son with Schizophrenia
    Author(s): Gionfriddo, Paul
    Abstract:

    Paul Gionfriddo’s son Tim is one of the “6 percent”—an American with serious mental illness. He is also one of the half million homeless people with serious mental illnesses in desperate need of help yet underserved or ignored by our health and social-service systems.

    In this moving, detailed, clear-eyed exposé, Gionfriddo describes how Tim and others like him come to live on the street. Gionfriddo takes stock of the numerous injustices that kept his son from realizing his potential from the time Tim first began to show symptoms of schizophrenia to the inadequate educational supports he received growing up, his isolation from family and friends, and his frequent encounters with the juvenile justice system and, later, the adult criminal-justice system and its substandard mental health care. Tim entered adulthood with limited formal education, few work skills, and a chronic, debilitating disease that took him from the streets to jails to hospitals and then back to the streets. Losing Tim shows that people with mental illness become homeless as a result not of bad choices but of bad policy. As a former state policy maker, Gionfriddo concludes with recommendations for reforming America’s ailing approach to mental health.

  • Child Welfare for the Twenty-first Century: A Handbook of Practices, Policies, and Programs, second edition Mallon, Gerald P.; Hess, Peg McCartt Child Welfare for the Twenty-first Century: A Handbook of Practices, Policies, and Programs, second edition
    Author(s): Mallon, Gerald P.; Hess, Peg McCartt
    Abstract:

    The Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA), which became law in 1997, elicited a major shift in federal policy and thinking toward child welfare, emphasizing children’s safety, permanency, and well-being over preserving biological ties at all costs. The first edition of this volume mapped the field of child welfare after ASFA’s passage, detailing the practices, policies, programs, and research affected by the legislation’s new attitude toward care. This second edition highlights the continuously changing child welfare climate in the U.S., including content on the Fostering Connections Act of 2008.

    The authors have updated the text throughout, drawing from real-world case examples and data obtained from the national Child and Family Services Reviews and emerging empirically based practices. They have also added chapters addressing child welfare workforce issues, supervision, and research and evaluation. The volume is divided into four sections—child and adolescent well-being, child and adolescent safety, permanency for children and adolescents, and systemic issues within services, policies, and programs. Recognized scholars, practitioners, and policy makers discuss meaningful engagement with families, particularly Latino families; health care for children and youth, including mental health care; effective practices with LGBT youth and their families; placement stability; foster parent recruitment and retention; and the challenges of working with immigrant children, youth, and families.